Food and drink

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2018 file photo, romaine lettuce sits on the shelves as a shopper walks through the produce area of an Albertsons market in Simi Valley, Calif. After repeated food poisoning outbreaks linked to romaine lettuce, the produce industry is confronting the failure of its own safety measures in preventing contaminations. The latest outbreak underscores the challenge of eliminating risk for vegetables grown in open fields and eaten raw. It also highlights the role of nearby cattle operations and the delay of stricter federal food safety regulations. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
November 29, 2018 - 6:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — After repeated food poisoning outbreaks linked to romaine lettuce, the produce industry is confronting the failure of its own safety measures in preventing contaminations. The E. coli outbreak announced just before Thanksgiving follows one in the spring that sickened more than 200...
Read More
FILE--In this Feb. 23, 2004, file photo, winemaker David Lett savors the bouquet from a glass of Pinot Noir at his Eyrie Vinyards home in Dundee, Ore. Officials in Oregon and at a U.S. government agency are similarly finicky, and have told a California winery to back off its claims it makes an Oregon pinot noir. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, file)
November 28, 2018 - 6:59 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Pinot noir is one of the finickiest grapes, but with proper nurturing it produces an amazing wine. Officials in Oregon and at a U.S. government agency are similarly finicky, and are stomping on a California winery's claims that it makes an Oregon pinot. Copper Cane, a Napa Valley...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2018, file photo Lisa Dennis selects a head of green lettuce from the vegetable shelves at the East End Food Co-op Federal Credit Union in Pittsburgh. Health officials on Monday, Nov. 26, said it's OK to eat some romaine lettuce again. The Food and Drug Administration is narrowing last week’s alert warning people not to eat any romaine because of an E. coli outbreak. The agency hasn’t identified a source of contamination. But it says it's OK to eat romaine from parts of California and Arizona that were not harvesting when the illnesses began in October. (Jessie Wardarski/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP, File)
November 26, 2018 - 8:50 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — It's OK to eat some romaine lettuce again, U.S. health officials said. Just check the label. The Food and Drug Administration narrowed its blanket warning from last week, when it said people shouldn't eat any romaine because of an E. coli outbreak. The agency said Monday the romaine...
Read More
Lisa Dennis of Regent Square selects a head of green lettuce from the vegetable shelves at the East End Food Co-op Federal Credit Union Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018, in Pittsburgh. Due to a recent consumer alert regarding a multi state E.Coli outbreak the Co-op has replaced their fresh and bagged romaine lettuce with blue signs reading, "The CDC has issued a Consumer Alert for romaine lettuce due to a multi state E.Coli outbreak." (Jessie Wardarski/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)
November 20, 2018 - 10:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials in the U.S. and Canada told people Tuesday to stop eating romaine lettuce because of a new E. coli outbreak. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it is working with officials in Canada on the outbreak, which has sickened 32 people in 11 states and 18 people in...
Read More
This image provided by Hormel Foods Corporation shows the production code information on the side of the sleeve of Jennie-O-Turkey that is being recalled. Jennie-O-Turkey is recalling more than 91,000 pounds of raw turkey in an ongoing salmonella outbreak. Regulators say additional products from other companies could be named as their investigation continues. The products being recalled include 1-pound packages of raw, ground turkey and were shipped to retailers nationwide. Regulators say the product should be thrown away and not eaten. (Hormel Foods Corporation via AP)
November 16, 2018 - 3:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Jennie-O Turkey recalled ground turkey in a salmonella outbreak, and regulators say additional products from other companies could be named as their investigation continues. The recall was the first — not counting pet food — tied to a widespread and ongoing outbreak that has...
Read More
Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 3:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
Read More
U.S President Donald Trump, left, shakes hands with French President Emmanuel Macron during ceremonies at the Arc de Triomphe Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018 in Paris. Over 60 heads of state and government were taking part in a solemn ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the mute and powerful symbol of sacrifice to the millions who died from 1914-18. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, Pool)
November 13, 2018 - 7:06 pm
PARIS (AP) — U.S. President Donald Trump is partly right but far from completely correct when he says that France's "big tariffs" make it hard for American vintners to sell their wines to the French. Wrong because customs duties on imported wines are applied not by France but by the European Union...
Read More
This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018 photo shows part of an ingredient label, which lists "artificial flavoring," on a packet of candy in New York. In November 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has decided to give companies two years to purge their products of the six ingredients, described only as “artificial flavors” on packages. The words “artificial flavor” or “natural flavor” refer to any of thousands of ingredients. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)
November 13, 2018 - 10:28 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators are giving food companies two years to remove six artificial flavors from their products, even though they say the ingredients are safe in the trace amounts used. The move highlights tension between consumer advocates, who want to know more about what exactly is in...
Read More
This undated product image provided by Ben & Jerry’s shows the rebranded ice cream flavor Pecan Resist. Ben & Jerry’s says it’s taking a stand against what it calls the Trump administration’s regressive policies with the ice cream flavor. The company and its founders are unveiling the limited batch ice cream flavor Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, in Washington ahead of the mid-term elections. (Ben & Jerry’s via AP)
October 30, 2018 - 12:31 pm
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Ice cream maker Ben & Jerry's is taking a stand against what it calls the Trump administration's regressive policies by rebranding one of its flavors Pecan Resist. The company and its founders unveiled the limited batch ice cream flavor Pecan Resist Tuesday in Washington...
Read More
FILE - This July 11, 2018, file photo shows yogurt on display at a grocery store in River Ridge, La. The Food and Drug Administration established a standard for yogurt in 1981 that limited the ingredients. The industry swiftly objected, and the following year the agency suspended enforcement on various provisions, and allowed the addition of preservatives. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
September 25, 2018 - 8:59 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If low-fat yogurt is blended with fatty ingredients like coconut or chocolate, is it still low-fat? Is it even yogurt? The U.S. government has rules about what can be called "yogurt," and the dairy industry says it's not clear what the answers are. Now it's hopeful it will finally...
Read More

Pages