Lifestyle

This image released by Bill Hill shows Mary Hill, left, and her husband Bill, right, with their 8-year-old grandson in suburban Phoenix. The 72-year-old Bill, a former college sports administrator, and 70-year-old Mary, who worked as a nurse practitioner, volunteered to keep Will five days a week and oversee distance learning after their son and daughter-in-law were required to report in person to the school where they teach. (Bill Hill via AP)
August 20, 2020 - 12:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Gone, for now, are the days when retirees Bill and Mary Hill could do whatever they please. Since school started for their only grandchild, they're not leisurely reading the morning newspaper, dawdling over a sudoku or staying holed up in their Colorado cabin to beat the Arizona...
Read More
FILE - In this April 3, 2019 file photo, actress Lori Loughlin, front, and husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, left, depart federal court in Boston after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. The famous couple pleaded guilty to charges in May 2020, and are scheduled to be sentenced on Friday, Aug. 21, 2020. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
August 20, 2020 - 11:16 am
BOSTON (AP) — Since “Full House” star Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, were arrested last year on charges that they bribed their daughters' way into college, the famous couple has been consistent about at least one thing: their silence. Loughlin, who gained fame...
Read More
AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin;
August 20, 2020 - 2:34 am
How will office life be different in a pandemic? The office you once knew is likely to look vastly different. Companies are taking a variety of steps to keep people a safe distance apart, such as using staggered shifts or asking people to come in on alternating days. Cubicles may also have higher...
Read More
This photo provided by Polk Imaging shows Drive 'N Drag at Westfield Garden State Plaza, in Paramus, N.J. After being closed for months due to the pandemic, malls are bringing all types of drive-in entertainment to their massive parking lots, hoping to lure people back to their properties. (Dave Kotinsky/Polk Imaging for Westfield via AP)
August 19, 2020 - 9:08 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Angel Dougherty went to the mall last month — not to shop, but to watch a drive-in drag show in the parking lot. “This year has been so anxiety filled and chaotic, I figured this experience would be something to lighten the mood,” says Dougherty, who paid to see the stars of TV's “...
Read More
This undated photo shows a dog being weighed at Mission Animal Hospital in Eden Prairie, Minn., which provides subsidized care to low income pet owners. (Kirsten Eitreim/Mission Animal Hospital via AP)
August 18, 2020 - 7:43 am
Early in May, Nydia Bonefont was concerned when her dog wouldn’t eat and seemed lethargic. She realized that Papi, a 9-year-old Beagle/Cavalier mix, must have hurt himself — he cried when he was touched. But she was without income to pay for vet care. “I lost my job a while ago, and then the...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2019, file photo, people gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington. A federal judge has blocked the Trump administration from enforcing a new regulation that would roll back health care protections for transgender people. The regulation from the federal Department of Health and Human Services was finalized days after the Supreme Court barred sex discrimination against LGBT individuals on the job. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 17, 2020 - 7:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge blocked the Trump administration on Monday from enforcing a new regulation that would roll back health care protections for transgender people. Finalized days after the Supreme Court barred sex discrimination against LGBT individuals on the job, the regulation from...
Read More
Fashion designer Stella Jean talks during an interview with the Associated Press, in Rome, Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020. Stella Jean, a Haitian-Italian designer born and raised in Rome, launched her appeal this summer. She asked the Italian National Fashion Chamber and the global powerhouses steering it, including Prada, Ferragamo and Zegna, to back their social media pledges supporting the Black Lives Matter movement with concrete, transparent commitments toward greater racial diversity. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
August 17, 2020 - 7:01 am
MILAN (AP) — The only Black designer belonging to Italy’s influential fashion council is demanding a "long overdue cultural reform’’ from her colleagues under the slogan: Do Black Lives Matter in Italy? The conversation has gotten off to a rocky start. Stella Jean, a Haitian-Italian designer born...
Read More
A statue of Febb Ensminger Burn and her son, Harry Burn, stands in downtown Knoxville, Tenn., on Feb. 3, 2020. Women in the United States were guaranteed the right to vote with ratification of the 19th Amendment — secured by a 24-year-old Tennessee legislator's decisive vote, cast at the bidding of his mother. (Brianna Paciorka/Knoxville News Sentinel via AP)
August 15, 2020 - 11:07 am
One hundred years ago this month, women in the United States were guaranteed the right to vote with ratification of the 19th Amendment — secured by a 24-year-old Tennessee legislator's decisive vote, cast at the bidding of his mother. Harry T. Burn's surprise move set the stage for decades of slow...
Read More
Zita Robinson, left, who's 77 and diabetic, blows a kiss to her granddaughter Traris "Trary" Robinson-Newman, 8, who blows a kiss back to her, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020, in Phoenix. Robinson has been careful around her granddaughter amid the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
August 15, 2020 - 10:09 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Zita Robinson, who's 77 and diabetic, has been careful around her granddaughter since the coronavirus pandemic took hold. A door connects Robinson's apartment in Phoenix to the main house where 8-year-old Traris “Trary” Robinson-Newman and her mother live, but it mostly stays shut...
Read More
This photo combination shows digital colorization, left, by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave, and original black and white file photo that smoke rises around 20,000 feet above Hiroshima, Japan, after the first atomic bomb was dropped on Aug. 6, 1945. Niwata and Watanave are adding color to pre-war and wartime photographs using a combination of methods. These include AI technologies, but also traditional methods to fill the gaps in automated coloring. These include going door to door interviewing survivors who track back childhood memories, and communicating on social media to gather information from a wider audience. The team has brought to life more than a thousand black-and-white photographs that illustrate the pre-war lives of ordinary people and chronicles the onset and destruction caused by World War II. (Anju Niwata & Hidenori Watanave via AP)
August 13, 2020 - 9:50 pm
TOKYO (AP) — When Tokuso Hamai saw the colorized version of an old black-and-white photo of a picnic held under cherry tree blossoms sometime before World War II, forgotten memories of family members, most of whom died in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945, came pouring out. “In colorized...
Read More

Pages