Science

FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file photo elephants drink water in the Chobe National Park in Botswana. Botswana's government says it has lifted its ban on elephant hunting, a decision that is likely to bring protests from wildlife protection groups. (AP Photo/Charmaine Noronha, File)
May 23, 2019 - 12:51 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Botswana has lifted its ban on elephant hunting in a country with the world's highest number of the animals, a decision that has brought anger from some wildlife protection groups and warnings of a blow to lucrative tourism. The southern African nation is home to an estimated...
Read More
May 23, 2019 - 11:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Atlantic hurricane season is off to yet another early start, but U.S. weather officials say it should be a near normal year. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday predicted nine to 15 named storms. It says four to eight of them will become hurricanes...
Read More
In this photo provided by the Max Planck Institute a wild chimpanzee eats a tortoise, whose hard shell was cracked against tree trunks before scooping out the meat at the Loango National Park on the Atlantic coast of Gabon, May 20, 2019. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrueck said Thursday they spotted the unusual behavior dozens of times in a group of chimpanzees at Loango National Park in Gabon. (Erwan Theleste/Max Planck Institute via AP)
May 23, 2019 - 8:46 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists have observed wild chimpanzees tucking into an unusual snack: tortoises, whose hard shells they crack against tree trunks before scooping out the meat. In a paper published Thursday by the journal Scientific Reports, researchers from Germany say the behavior they spotted...
Read More
In this Friday, May 17, 2019 photo, a sea dragon swims at the Birch Aquarium at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego in San Diego. The Southern California aquarium has built what is believed to be one of the world's largest habitats for the surreal and mythical sea dragons outside Australia, where the native populations are threatened by pollution, warming oceans and the illegal pet and alternative medicine trades. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
May 22, 2019 - 8:34 am
LA JOLLA, California (AP) — At first glance, it looks like a branch of kelp, but then an eye moves among its leafy appendages, and ridges of tiny, translucent fins start to flutter, sending the creature gliding through the water like something from a fairy tale. A Southern California aquarium has...
Read More
FILE - In this April 19, 2019, file photo, Katrina Spade, the founder and CEO of Recompose, a company that hopes to use composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains, poses for a photo in a cemetery in Seattle, as she displays a sample of compost material left from the decomposition of a cow using a combination of wood chips, alfalfa and straw. On Tuesday, May 21, 2019, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill into law that allows licensed facilities to offer "natural organic reduction," which turns a body, mixed with substances such as wood chips and straw, into soil in a span of several weeks. Th law makes Washington the first state in the U.S. to approve composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 21, 2019 - 5:34 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Ashes to ashes, guts to dirt. Gov. Jay Inslee signed legislation Tuesday making Washington the first state to approve composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains. It allows licensed facilities to offer "natural organic reduction," which turns a body, mixed with...
Read More
In this April 25, 2019, photo, science teacher Sarah Ott speaks to her class about climate literacy in Dalton, Ga. Teachers across the country describe struggles finding trustworthy materials to help them teach their students about climate change. (AP Photo/Sarah Blake Morgan)
May 15, 2019 - 7:44 am
When science teacher Diana Allen set out to teach climate change, a subject she'd never learned in school, she fell into a rabbit's hole of misinformation: Many resources presented online as educational material were actually junk. "It is a pretty scary topic to take on," said Allen, a teacher at...
Read More
May 15, 2019 - 5:49 am
TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese startup that launched a rocket into space last month plans to provide low-cost rocket services and compete with American rivals such as SpaceX, its founder said Wednesday. Interstellar Technology Inc. founder Takafumi Horie said a low-cost rocket business in Japan is well-...
Read More
In this image made from video, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres addresses the Pacific Islands Forum, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Suva, Fiji. Guterres says he’s traveling to three South Pacific island nations to see the effects of climate change firsthand. Speaking in Fiji at a meeting with officials from the Pacific Islands Forum, the U.N. leader says he wants to learn about the work being undertaken by island communities to bolster resilience. (Fiji Broadcasting via AP)
May 15, 2019 - 3:10 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said Wednesday that he's traveling to three South Pacific island nations to see the effects of climate change firsthand. Speaking in Fiji, the U.N. leader said he wanted to learn about the work being undertaken by island...
Read More
FILE - In this November 1969 photo provided by NASA, Apollo 12 mission Commander Charles P. "Pete" Conrad stands on the moon's surface. He was the third man to walk on the moon. On Tuesday, May 14, 2019, NASA's chief says the Trump administration's proposed $1.6 billion budget boost is a "good start" for putting astronauts back on the moon. (AP Photo/NASA)
May 14, 2019 - 3:17 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA's chief said Tuesday that the Trump administration's proposed $1.6 billion budget boost is a "good start" for getting astronauts back on the moon within five years. Administrator Jim Bridenstine addressed employees a day after the White House introduced the budget...
Read More
German Chancellor Angela Merkel,right, German Environment Minister Svenja Schulze, left, and Chilean Environment Minister Carolina Schmidt, center, pose for media in front of the Brandenburg Gate prior to a session of the 10th 'Petersberger Klimadialog' climate conference in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, May 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
May 14, 2019 - 4:33 am
BERLIN (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel says she would like to join other European countries in aiming to eliminate virtually all greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, but the goal needs to be achievable. Merkel initially refused to join the initiative put forward last week by French President...
Read More

Pages