Science

On of the so called "hunger stones" exposed by the low level of water in the Elbe river is seen in Decin, Czech Republic, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018. The low level of water caused by the recent drought has exposed some stones at the river bed whose appearances in history meant for people to get ready for troubles. They are known as the "hunger stones" and they were chosen in the past to record low water levels. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
August 23, 2018 - 8:56 am
DECIN, Czech Republic (AP) — Due to this summer's drought in Central Europe, boulders known as "hunger stones" are reappearing in the Elbe River. The low water levels in the river that begins in the Czech Republic then crosses Germany into the North Sea has exposed stones on the river bed whose...
Read More
This photo taken by North Carolina investigators shows 43-year-old Darold Wayne Bowden during his arrest on suspicion of rape at his home in North Carolina. The Fayetteville Police Department issued a news release Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, saying that 43-year-old Darold Wayne Bowden has been charged with multiple rape counts related to six assaults from 2006 to 2008. (Fayetteville Police Department via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 4:20 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Investigators compared online family tree data with crime-scene DNA evidence to identify and track down a suspect in a series of North Carolina rapes from a decade ago, police said Wednesday. One of the lead detectives called the approach, similar to what was used in the "...
Read More
FILE - In this July 21, 2016 file photo, fireflies light up in synchronized bursts as photographers take long-exposure pictures, inside Piedra Canteada, a tourist camp cooperatively owned by 42 local families, inside an old-growth forest near the town of Nanacamilpa, Tlaxcala state, Mexico. A study released on Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018 in the journal Science Advances, says that fireflies seem to use their lights to tell bats they taste bad. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
August 22, 2018 - 1:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fireflies flash not just for sex, but survival, a new study suggests. Scientists wanted to find out if there's more to the lightning bug's signature blinking glow than finding a mate. Some experts had speculated it was a glaring signal to predators, like bats, that fireflies taste...
Read More
In this 2011 photo provided by Bence Viola of the University of Toronto, researchers excavate a cave for Denisovan fossils in the Altai Krai area of Russia. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, scientists reported in the journal Nature that they have found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. (Bence Viola/Department of Anthropology - University of Toronto/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 12:05 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct...
Read More
President Donald Trump speaks during an event to salute U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
August 20, 2018 - 7:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is set to roll back the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's efforts to slow global warming, the Clean Power Plan that restricts greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. A plan to be announced Tuesday would give states broad authority to...
Read More
August 20, 2018 - 7:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's plan to roll back the centerpiece of Obama-era efforts to slow global warming(all times local): 8:20 p.m. The Trump administration is set to announce plans to roll back the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's efforts to slow global...
Read More
In this July 29, 2017 photo provided by KYUK-TV shows a gray whale that was killed in the Kuskokwim River is butchered and the meat and blubber distributed. Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, according to a federal investigative report. The report, released to The Associated Press through a public records, says that after the shooting began, the hunters then believed the whale to be a bowhead and that the harvest would be theirs as the first to shoot or harpoon it. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided not to prosecute the hunters. Instead it sent letters advising leaders in three villages about the limits to subsistence whaling. (Katie Basile/KYUK via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 6:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, a federal investigative report said. After the...
Read More
AT 19 Aug 2018 14:56:27 UTC, an earthquake was reported at 4.5 km (2.8 mi) S of Belanting, Indonesia.
August 19, 2018 - 8:19 pm
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The Latest on earthquakes that have struck Indonesia's Lombok island (all times local): 8 a.m. A strong earthquake Sunday on the Indonesian island of Lombok has killed at least two people. National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho tweeted Monday...
Read More
August 18, 2018 - 8:09 pm
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — A deep, undersea earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 8.2 has struck Fiji and small tsunami waves have been observed but no damage reported. The U.S. Geological Survey says the quake hit at a depth of 560 kilometers (348 miles) and was located 280 kilometers (...
Read More
FILE - In this June 27, 2005, file photo, an Arctic grayling is shown in Emerald Lake in Bozeman, Mont. A federal appeals court says U.S. wildlife officials did not consider all environmental factors when it decided against designating a Montana fish as a threatened or endangered species. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday, Aug. 17, 2018, sent a lawsuit seeking federal protections for the Arctic grayling back to a lower court for further consideration. (Ben Pierce/Bozeman Daily Chronicle via AP, File)
August 17, 2018 - 6:54 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — An appeals court on Friday told a judge to take another look at whether a Montana fish should be protected, saying that U.S. wildlife officials did not consider all environmental factors when they decided against designating the Arctic grayling as a threatened or endangered...
Read More

Pages