FILE - In this July 5, 2015, file photo, the United States Women’s National Team celebrates with the trophy after they defeated Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women’s World Cup soccer championship in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. People with knowledge of FIFA’s finances told The Associated Press that in the four-year period covering the 2018 World Cup, FIFA’s reserves soared to $2.74 billion and revenue rose to $6.4 billion, but it also underscores the glaring disparity between men and women’s soccer. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

FIFA's record finances reignites World Cup pay parity debate

March 06, 2019 - 6:58 pm

LONDON (AP) — FIFA is awash with cash four years since police raided the homes and offices of soccer officials in a scandal that threatened its existence.

People with knowledge of FIFA's finances tell AP that in the four-year period covering the 2018 World Cup, FIFA's reserves soared to $2.74 billion and revenue rose to $6.4 billion. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the financial results remain confidential

But while the annual report underscores FIFA's financial vitality, it also highlights the glaring disparity between men and women's soccer.

Last summer's World Cup is a good example: France banked $38 million from FIFA for winning the championship, but the women's champion this July will earn just $4 million.

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