This image released by Lucasfilm shows Daisy Ridley as Rey in "Star Wars: The Last Jedi." Despite enthusiastic discourse around diversity in film, a report from the University of Southern California’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiative says when it comes to the numbers, little has changed. In a survey of the top 100 films of 2017, 33 featured women in a lead or co-lead. And 31.8 percent of the speaking characters were female, a number that has stayed static for a decade. (Lucasfilm via AP)

Film inclusion report says rhetoric doesn't equal results

July 31, 2018 - 6:14 am

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Despite enthusiastic discourse around diversity in film, a report from the University of Southern California's Annenberg Inclusion Initiative says when it comes to the numbers, little has changed.

In a survey of the top 100 films of 2017, 33 featured women in a lead or co-lead. And 31.8 percent of the speaking characters were female, a number that has stayed static for a decade.

The study released Tuesday also says that women of color are among the most marginalized. Sixty four of the top 100 films did not include a single Latina character, 65 were missing an Asian female, and 43 were devoid of a black female character.

The author of the report suggests solutions like the inclusion rider, a concept popularized by Frances McDormand in her Oscars speech.

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