Atmospheric science

A visitor rests at the COP25 climate talks congress in Madrid, Spain, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019. The United Nations Secretary-General has warned that failure to tackle global warming could result in economic disaster. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
December 14, 2019 - 9:43 am
MADRID (AP) — Chilean officials presiding over this year's U.N. climate talks said Saturday they plan to propose a compromise to bridge yawning differences among countries that have been deadlocked on key issues for the past two weeks. With the meeting already into extra time, draft documents...
Read More
A fire prevention crew hauls away sections of a tree they cut down Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, near Redwood Estates, Calif. Authorities are rushing to clear vegetation in high-risk communities after fires killed 149 people and destroyed almost 25,000 homes over the past three years. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)
December 13, 2019 - 11:08 am
SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS, Calif. (AP) — Buzzing chainsaws are interrupted by the frequent crash of breaking branches as crews fell towering trees and clear tangled brush in the densely forested Santa Cruz Mountains south of San Francisco. Their goal: To protect communities such as Redwood Estates,...
Read More
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg addresses plenary of U.N. climate conference during with a meeting with leading climate scientists at the COP25 summit in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. Thunberg is in Madrid where a global U.N.-sponsored climate change conference is taking place. (AP Photo/Paul White)
December 11, 2019 - 7:45 am
MADRID (AP) — Activist Greta Thunberg accused governments and businesses of misleading the public by holding climate talks that are not achieving real action against what she called the world's “climate emergency.” In a speech peppered with scientific facts about global warming, the Swedish 16-year...
Read More
In this Nov. 27, 2019, photo, Georgia Tech professor Kim Cobb poses for a photo at her home in Atlanta. Some climate scientists and activists, including Cobb, are limiting their flying, their consumption of meat and their overall carbon footprints to avoid adding to the global warming they study. (AP Photo/John Amis)
December 08, 2019 - 6:50 am
For years, Kim Cobb was the Indiana Jones of climate science. The Georgia Tech professor flew to the caves of Borneo to study ancient and current climate conditions. She jetted to a remote South Pacific island to see the effects of warming on coral. Add to that flights to Paris, Rome, Vancouver and...
Read More
A new study finds that past computer simulations of climate change have been pretty accurate.;
December 04, 2019 - 11:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The computer models used to simulate what heat-trapping gases will do to global temperatures have been pretty spot-on in their predictions, a new study found. After years of hearing critics blast the models' accuracy, climate scientist Zeke Hausfather decided to see just how good...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2019, file photo, smoke and steam rise from a coal processing plant that produces carbon black, an ingredient in steel manufacturing, in Hejin in central China's Shanxi Province. A new study finds that global man-made carbon pollution continues to rise, but it's not increasing as fast as the previous couple years. The study published Tuesday, Dec. 3, by scientists at the Global Carbon Project finds carbon dioxide emissions increased six tenths of a percent from 2018. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil, File)
December 03, 2019 - 6:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world continues to increase the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide it pumps into the air, but it’s not rising as fast as in the previous couple years. Led by big jumps from China and India, the world is projected to spew 40.57 billion tons (36.8 billion metric tons) of...
Read More
Kjetil Wormnes, automation and robotics system engineer, poses with the Space Rover after a training exercise of the European Space Agency, ESA, in Katwijk, near The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Nov. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
KNSS News
November 28, 2019 - 10:14 am
MADRID (AP) — The 22 member states of the European Space agency pledged Thursday to boost their funding to support more missions and research projects, including a new generation of satellites to monitor climate change. The agency’s director-general, Jan Woerner, said at the conclusion two-day...
Read More
This May 3, 2009, photo taken in Point Hope, Alaska, provided by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, shows the entrance to an ice cellar, a type of underground food dug into the permafrost to provide natural refrigeration used for generations in far-north communities. Naturally cooled underground ice cellars, used in Alaska Native communities for generations, are becoming increasingly unreliable as a warming climate and other factors touch multiple facets of life in the far north. (Mike Brubaker/Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium via AP)
November 25, 2019 - 8:22 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — For generations, people in Alaska’s far-north whaling villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their subsistence food to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Scores of the naturally refrigerated food caches lie beneath...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
Read More
Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks after a climate change march in Los Angeles, on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. Thunberg says young people are rallying to fight climate change because their age leaves them with the most to lose from damage to the planet. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
November 02, 2019 - 8:41 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Greta Thunberg, Sweden's 16-year-old climate-change activist, joined fellow teenagers from throughout California Friday in telling a cheering crowd of hundreds at a Los Angeles rally that they can and will fight to save their planet from global warming. Thunberg, who has been...
Read More

Pages