Biology

FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, apparently confirming fears about the invaders' threat to native species, according to a newly released study. Analysis of more than 20 years of population data suggests the carp are out-competing fish prized by anglers, such as yellow perch, bluegill, and black and white crappie, the report said. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
KNSS News
November 16, 2019 - 10:16 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A new study says sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp. The study’s lead author says it’s among the first to establish a solid link between the presence of invasive carp and a drop-off of native species...
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November 12, 2019 - 4:40 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Billionaire philanthropists Joan and Sandy Weill announced Tuesday they are donating $106 million to launch a research initiative at three West Coast universities aimed at finding treatments for brain disorders like epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. The donation to the...
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This 2005 photo provided by Bethany Bradley shows cheatgrass, at right, invading shrubs, left, near Lovelock, Nev. A new study finds that for much of the United States, invasive grass species, such as cheatgrass, are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California. (Bethany Bradley/University of Massachusetts via AP)
November 04, 2019 - 2:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For much of the United States, invasive grass species are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California, a new study finds. Twelve non-native species act as "little arsonist grasses," said study co-author Bethany Bradley, a University of Massachusetts...
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File - In this Oct. 26, 2019, file photo, riders herd bison during the annual bison roundup on Antelope Island in Utah. Evidence is mounting that wild North American bison are gradually shedding their genetic diversity across many of the isolated herds overseen by the U.S. government, weakening future resilience against disease and climate events in the shadow of human encroachment. Advances in genetics are bringing the concern in to sharper focus. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
November 03, 2019 - 10:38 am
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Evidence is mounting that wild North American bison are gradually shedding their genetic diversity across many of the isolated herds overseen by the U.S. government, weakening future resilience against disease and climate events in the shadow of human encroachment. The extent...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
October 21, 2019 - 10:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The paralysis is very rare. U.S. health officials have confirmed 590 cases over the past five years. Finding the cause...
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Professor Gregg Semenza, accompanied by Johns Hopkins University President Ron Daniels, waves to the crowd during a news conference after he was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine Hospital in Baltimore, Md., Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine has been jointly awarded to William Kaelin Jr., Sir Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza for their pioneering research into how human cells respond to changing oxygen levels. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
October 07, 2019 - 7:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Two Americans and a British scientist won a Nobel Prize on Monday for discovering details of how the body's cells sense and react to low oxygen levels, providing a foothold for developing new treatments for anemia, cancer and other diseases. Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. of Harvard...
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This undated photo provided by Johns Hopkins University shows Gregg L. Semenza at the university in Baltimore. Semenza, a Johns Hopkins University researcher, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. He will share the prize with Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. and Peter J. Ratcliffe for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability, the Nobel Committee announced Monday. (Johns Hopkins University via AP)
October 07, 2019 - 7:48 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (all times local): 2:40 p.m. Dr. Gregg Semenza, a top researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, says he was awakened by a call from Stockholm shortly before 4 a.m. with the good news that he is one of three...
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October 03, 2019 - 10:54 am
BEDFORD, N.H. (AP) — A young moose that got stuck in a New Hampshire swimming pool has been successfully coaxed out. New Hampshire Fish and Game Department biologists and conservation officers were called to a Bedford home Tuesday to help remove the young bull. He was in the water for several hours...
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FILE -In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, a baby dugong named Marium swims near the hull of a boat off Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
October 03, 2019 - 5:30 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist has urged Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an imperiled sea mammal, after their death toll for the year in Thai waters has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a...
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October 03, 2019 - 3:30 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a dugong was...
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