Biology

In this undated photo provided by researchers in December 2018, a male tungara frog in Panama uses his vocal sac to call out in Gamboa, Panama. A study released on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, examines why these amphibians adapt their mating calls in urban areas _ an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on forests. (Adam Dunn via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 10:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — City frogs and rainforest frogs don't sing the same tune, researchers have found. A study released Monday examined why Panama's tiny tungara frogs adapt their mating calls in urban areas — an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on...
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The 2018 Nobel Chemistry laureate, Frances H. Arnold poses during the traditional Nobel Chair Signing ceremony at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm, Sweden, on Thursday Dec. 6, 2018. (Claudio Brescian/TT via AP)
December 07, 2018 - 4:39 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry say that excessive concerns about genetically modified foods and other substances can inhibit mankind from benefiting from developments in the field. Frances Arnold from the United States and Gregory Winter of Britain made the...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China's government on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018, ordered a halt to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 02, 2018 - 7:12 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Early last year, a little-known Chinese researcher turned up at an elite meeting in Berkeley, California, where scientists and ethicists were discussing a technology that had shaken the field to its core — an emerging tool for "editing" genes, the strings of DNA that form the...
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In this Nov. 28, 2018, photo, He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, speaks during the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong. He made his first public comments about his claim to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. The uproar over the unproven report of gene-edited births in China has researchers elsewhere worried about a backlash. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
November 30, 2018 - 12:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists working on the frontiers of medicine fear the uproar over the reported births of gene-edited babies in China could jeopardize promising research into how to alter heredity to fend off a variety of disorders. Researchers are rapidly learning how to edit DNA to fight such...
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In this Oct. 9, 2018, photo, Zhou Xiaoqin installs a fine glass pipette into a sperm injection microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China's government on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018, ordered a halt to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 29, 2018 - 12:58 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — China's government ordered a halt Thursday to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies, as a group of leading scientists declared that it's still too soon to try to make permanent changes to DNA that can be inherited by future...
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He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, center, speaks during the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018. He made his first public comments about his claim to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
November 29, 2018 - 6:09 am
HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on a Chinese scientist's claim to have made the world's first gene-edited babies (all times local): 7:30 p.m. China's government has ordered a halt to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. Vice Minister of Science...
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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2009 file photo, boaters and fishermen watch as a group of up to six humpback whales feed on herring near Ketchikan, Alaska. Over the past several years researchers have noticed a decline in the number of North Pacific humpback whales showing up in their traditional breeding grounds around Hawaii. The missing humpbacks migrate each autumn from Alaska, where they feed during the summer months, to Hawaii, where they mate and give birth during the winter. (Tom Miller/Ketchikan Daily News via AP, file)
November 28, 2018 - 3:56 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Research into the decline of humpback whale sightings in Hawaii points to a food chain disruption likely caused by warmer ocean temperatures in the whales' feeding grounds in Alaska, federal officials have said. U.S. and international researchers, wildlife managers and federal...
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He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, speaks during the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018. He made his first public comments about his claim to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
November 28, 2018 - 9:06 am
HONG KONG (AP) — A Chinese researcher who claims to have helped make the world's first genetically edited babies says a second pregnancy may be underway. The researcher, He Jiankui of Shenzhen, revealed the pregnancy Wednesday while making his first public comments about his controversial work at...
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Feng Zhang, center, an institute member of Harvard and MIT's Broad Institute, is surrounded by reporters while speaking on the issue of world's first genetically edited babies after the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, claims that he helped make the world's first genetically edited babies twin girls whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life. If true, it would be a profound leap of science and ethics. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
November 28, 2018 - 3:09 am
HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on a scientist's claim to have made the world's first gene-edited babies (all times local): 4:30 p.m. A Chinese researcher who claims to have helped make the world's first genetically edited babies says a second pregnancy may be underway. The researcher, He Jiankui (HEH...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui is reflected in a glass panel as he works at a computer at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 27, 2018 - 5:40 pm
SHENZHEN, China (AP) — The Chinese scientist who says he helped make the world's first gene-edited babies veered off a traditional career path, keeping much of his research secret in pursuit of a larger goal — making history. He Jiankui's outsized aspirations began to take shape in 2016, the year...
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