Biology

In this 2011 photo provided by Bence Viola of the University of Toronto, researchers excavate a cave for Denisovan fossils in the Altai Krai area of Russia. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, scientists reported in the journal Nature that they have found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. (Bence Viola/Department of Anthropology - University of Toronto/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 12:05 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct...
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FILE - This file photo provided by the Bexar County Sheriff Office in San Antonio, Texas, shows Jose Nunez, a deputy sheriff who was jailed in June 2018 on charges alleging that he sexually assaulted a 4-year-old girl and threatened her mother with deportation. The Bexar County sheriff's office says Nunez died Monday, Aug. 20 at the jail in nearby Karnes County. Bexar County Sheriff Office via AP, File)
August 21, 2018 - 3:19 pm
SAN ANTONIO (AP) — A Texas sheriff's deputy accused of repeatedly sexually assaulting a 4-year-old girl and threatening her mother with deportation if she reported the abuse died in jail from an apparent suicide, according to authorities. Jose Nunez, 47, was found dead in his cell at the Karnes...
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August 19, 2018 - 5:07 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Climate change could be to blame for the collapse of bird populations in the desert along the Nevada-California border, scientists said. The number of bird species has fallen by an average of 43 percent over the past century at survey sites across an area larger than New York state...
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A sign warns visitors to Long Nook Beach of recent shark sightings, Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018 in Truro, Mass. A man swimming off Cape Cod was attacked by a shark on Wednesday and was airlifted to a hospital. It was the first shark attack on a human on the popular summer tourist destination since 2012. (Merrily Cassidy/The Cape Cod Times via AP)
August 15, 2018 - 7:14 pm
TRURO, Mass. (AP) — A man swimming off Cape Cod was attacked by a shark on Wednesday and was airlifted to a hospital. It was the first shark attack on a human at the popular summer tourist destination since 2012. The victim was a 61-year-old man, who suffered puncture wounds to his torso and legs,...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 file photo, a nurse practitioner prepares to start the first human gene editing treatment for Hunter syndrome, an inherited metabolic disease, at a hospital in Oakland, Calif. On Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, federal officials said that gene therapy is becoming an established form of medical care and carries no special risks that warrant special regulation, as they revised rules for vetting such experiments and products. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 15, 2018 - 5:55 pm
U.S. health officials are eliminating special regulations for gene therapy experiments, saying that what was once exotic science is quickly becoming an established form of medical care with no extraordinary risks. A special National Institutes of Health oversight panel will no longer review all...
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August 13, 2018 - 1:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — You know your cholesterol, your blood pressure ... your heart gene score? Researchers say a new way of analyzing genetic test data may one day help identify people at high risk of a youthful heart attack in time to help. Today, gene testing mostly focuses on rare mutations in one...
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Live chinook salmon aboard the King County Research Vessel SoundGardian are released into waters off San Juan Island, Wash, as a young female orca called J50 was not in the area on Friday Aug. 10, 2018. Experts have done a practice run to work out feeding live fish to the whale off Washington state so they're ready when they get a chance to save the ailing orca. The young female killer whale was too far north in Canadian waters for teams in boats carrying salmon to try to feed the emaciated animal Friday. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times via AP, Pool)
August 10, 2018 - 8:58 pm
FALSE BAY, Wash. (AP) — Teams taking drastic measures to save a young, ailing killer whale loaded up two boats with fat live salmon as the sun rose Friday and rushed to waters off Washington state's San Juan Island, preparing if needed to test-feed the critically endangered orca a day after...
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FILE - This September 2015 photo provided by NOAA Fisheries shows a aerial view of adult female Southern Resident killer whale (J16) swims with her calf (J50). Federal officials are weighing options to save an emaciated endangered orca that includes feeding it live salmon dosed with medicine. Biologists are worried about the survival of a 4-year-old orca known as J-50, a member of a dwindling population of whales that spend time in Pacific Northwest waters (NOAA Fisheries/Vancouver Aquarium via AP, File)
August 07, 2018 - 5:14 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Experts are preparing rare emergency efforts to administer antibiotics or feed live salmon to try to save a young emaciated orca that's part of a critically endangered pod of killer whales. But veterinarians haven't spotted the 3½-year-old female killer whale in several days. They...
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12-year-old Carlos Santamaria Diaz poses for photographers during a press event at Mexico's National Autonomous University in Mexico City, Friday, Aug. 3, 2018. The university, better known by its Spanish initials as the UNAM, said Thursday that Carlos Santamaria Diaz is the youngest such student in the university's roughly century-long history.(AP Photo / Marco Ugarte)
August 03, 2018 - 5:08 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — The youngest student ever admitted to Mexico's National Autonomous University wouldn't call himself a "genius." Carlos Santamaria Diaz, a 12-year-old who will begin classes for an undergraduate degree in biomedical physics Monday, was dwarfed by the upholstered blue chair he sat...
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In this July 27, 2018 photo, Susan Hewitt photographs a daisy-like weed known as 'shaggy soldier' and adds it to iNaturalist, the app she uses to participate in the New York City EcoFlora project. "If people could just take a few minutes to look at nature closely, I think they would be blown away," Hewitt said. Hundreds of New Yorkers are working with researchers to find and catalog wild plants in their city. They’re taking pictures with their smartphones as they walk the streets. Participants have already found invasive species, plants never documented before in New York City, and endangered native weeds. (AP Photo/Emiliano Rodriguez Mega)
August 03, 2018 - 9:01 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of New Yorkers are working with researchers to find and catalog wild plants in their city. They're taking pictures with their smartphones as they walk the streets. Since the project began last year, participants have found invasive species, plants never documented before in...
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