Biology

In this May 24, 2019 photo, teachers and students from Northwest Montessori School in Seattle examine the carcass of a gray whale after it washed up on the coast of Washington's Olympic Peninsula, just north of Kalaloch Campground in Olympic National Park. Federal scientists on Friday, May 31 opened an investigation into what is causing a spike in gray whale deaths along the West Coast this year. So far, about 70 whales have stranded on the coasts of Washington, Oregon, Alaska and California, the most since 2000. (AP Photo/Gene Johnson)
May 31, 2019 - 6:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — U.S. scientists said Friday they will investigate why an unusual number of gray whales are washing up dead on West Coast beaches. About 70 whales have been found dead so far this year on the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska, the most since 2000. About five more...
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This 2011 digitally-colorized electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a clump of green-colored, spheroid-shaped, Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria on a purple-colored matrix. We share our bodies with trillions of mostly friendly microbes that are important for things like good digestion. Now scientists are learning how that microbial zoo can change in ways that one day might let them predict who’s at risk for brewing health problems. (NIAID via AP)
May 29, 2019 - 12:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — We share our bodies with trillions of microbes that are critical to staying healthy, but now scientists are getting a much-needed close look at how those bugs can get out of whack and spur disease. One lesson: A single test to see what gut bacteria you harbor won't tell much...
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A protestor holds a poster as he attends a protest rally of the 'Friday For Future' movement in Berlin, Germany, Friday, May 24, 2019. Some thousands students attend the demonstration near the Brandenburg gate in the German capital. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
May 24, 2019 - 9:38 am
BERLIN (AP) — Protesters — many of them too young to vote — took to the streets Friday across the European Union to demand tougher action against global warming as the 28-nation bloc elects a new parliament. From Portugal to Finland, from Italy to Britain, students followed the call of Swedish...
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May 19, 2019 - 6:58 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska's fledgling commercial seaweed industry is growing, with producers excited about this year's harvest. There were no commercial seaweed farmers in Alaska five years ago, though there have long been subsistence seaweed harvests along Alaska coasts. Now, there are 16...
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May 10, 2019 - 4:11 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A microorganism that played a role in treating tuberculosis is now officially recognized as New Jersey's state microbe. Gov. Phil Murphy signed a bill Friday giving the distinction to Streptomyces (strep-toh-MY'-seez) griseus (GREE'-say-us). The microbe was discovered in New...
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Gov. Gavin Newsom gestures towards boxes of tampons and diapers after proposing to eliminate from the state sales tax on such products in his upcoming state budget during a news conference, Tuesday, May 7, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. The tax cuts are part of a "parents' agenda" Newsom is pursuing, and he plans to unveil a revised state budget later this week. Newsom was, accompanied by his wife, first partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom, center, Southern California Democratic Assemblywoman Monique Limon, right, and others.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
May 07, 2019 - 6:48 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom and his wife, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, unveiled Tuesday what they call a "parents' agenda," including proposals to end the sales tax on tampons and diapers and to use revenue from legal marijuana sales to expand child care programs. "The...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011, file photo, a lemur looks through the forest at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Andasibe, Madagascar. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso, File)
May 06, 2019 - 11:23 am
People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. But it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity...
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In this 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the American burying beetle handled in Rock Island, R.I. U.S. wildlife officials say the endangered carnivorous beetle is making a comeback and should be downlisted to threatened. The beetle was listed as endangered in 1989 after its historic range over 35 states and three Canadian provinces shrank to just eastern Oklahoma and Block Island off the cost of Rhode Island. Officials say populations now also can be found in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, Texas, and on Nantucket Island off the coast of Massachusetts. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 5:13 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Federal wildlife officials said Wednesday a large scavenging beetle that has been classified as endangered since 1989 has become more plentiful and should be downlisted to threatened, a decision that environmentalists said is not justified by scientific data. The American...
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Joergen Ree Wiig tries to reach the harness attached to a beluga whale before the Norwegian fishermen were able to removed the tight harness, off the northern Norwegian coast Friday, April 26, 2019. The harness strap which features a mount for an action camera, says "Equipment St. Petersburg" which has prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. (Joergen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Direcorate of Fisheries Sea Surveillance Unit via AP)
April 30, 2019 - 10:51 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A beluga whale found in Arctic Norway wearing a harness that suggests links to a military facility in Russia is so tame that residents can pet the mammal on its nose. The white whale found frolicking in the frigid harbor of Tufjord, a hamlet near Norway's northernmost...
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A beluga whale seen as it swims next to a fishing boat before Norwegian fishermen removed the tight harness, swimming off the northern Norwegian coast Friday, April 26, 2019. The harness strap which features a mount for an action camera, says "Equipment St. Petersburg" which has prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. (Joergen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Direcorate of Fisheries Sea Surveillance Unit via AP)
April 29, 2019 - 7:39 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A beluga whale found with a tight harness that appeared to be Russian made has raised the alarm of Norwegian officials and prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. Joergen Ree Wiig of the Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries...
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