Botany

FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2016 file photo, a herd of bison grazes in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park in Wyo. A study of grazing in Yellowstone National Park found that bison essentially mow and help fertilize their own grass. This allows allowing them to feed in one area for two to three months during the spring and summer. Researchers say they found that large numbers of bison grazing in one area stimulates the growth of nutritious grasses and keeps the area greener longer. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
November 21, 2019 - 11:27 am
MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — A study of grazing in Yellowstone National Park found that bison essentially mow and fertilize their own food. This allows them to graze in one area for two to three months during the spring and summer while other hoofed mammals must keep migrating to higher elevations to...
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This 2005 photo provided by Bethany Bradley shows cheatgrass, at right, invading shrubs, left, near Lovelock, Nev. A new study finds that for much of the United States, invasive grass species, such as cheatgrass, are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California. (Bethany Bradley/University of Massachusetts via AP)
November 04, 2019 - 2:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For much of the United States, invasive grass species are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California, a new study finds. Twelve non-native species act as "little arsonist grasses," said study co-author Bethany Bradley, a University of Massachusetts...
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September 27, 2019 - 5:32 am
GENEVA (AP) — An international conservation group is warning that more than half of the trees in Europe that exist nowhere else in the world are threatened with extinction. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature says in their latest assessment of Europe's biodiversity that 58% of...
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California citrus growers, packers and researchers gather for the opening of a new secure lab dedicated to the search for a cure for a deadly citrus-killing disease in Riverside, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019. Growers hope the lab will speed up the search for a cure to the disease, which is spread by a tiny insect and has ravaged groves in Florida and abroad. The lab will be run through a partnership with University of California, Riverside. (AP Photo/Amy Taxin)
September 26, 2019 - 5:09 pm
RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — In a lab southeast of Los Angeles, researchers are opening a new front in the yearslong battle against a tiny pest that has wreaked havoc on citrus groves around the world. California citrus growers and packers and the University of California, Riverside on Thursday marked...
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Pope Francis holds his skull cap in the Soamandrakizay esplanade as he celebrates a vigil with youth in Antananarivo, Madagascar, Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019. Francis is in Madagascar for the second leg of his weeklong trip to Africa. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
September 07, 2019 - 12:25 pm
ANTANARIVO, Madagascar (AP) — Pope Francis denounced the illegal logging and exploitation of Madagascar's unique natural resources on Saturday as he opened a visit to the Indian Ocean nation by urging the government to fight the corruption that is ravaging the island's ecosystem and keeping its...
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Baby elephants rub their trunks against a tree at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. Countries that are part of an international agreement on trade in endangered species agreed Tuesday to limit the sale of wild elephants, delighting conservationists but dismaying some of the African countries involved. (AP Photo/Khalil Senosi)
August 28, 2019 - 7:48 pm
GENEVA (AP) — From towering giraffes to bottom-feeding sharks and many species in between, endangered species got new protections under an agreement finalized Wednesday by most of the world's countries at a conference on saving plants and animals from the ravages of international trade. The 11-day...
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FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2018 file photo, people walk in Tree Library park in Milan, Italy. The city has ambitious plans to plant 3 million new trees by 2030_ a move that experts say could offer relief to the city's muggy and sometimes tropical weather. A study released on Thursday, July 4, 2019 says that the most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees - a trillion of them, maybe more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
July 04, 2019 - 1:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees, a study says. A trillion of them, maybe more. And there's enough room, Swiss scientists say. Even with existing cities and farmland, there's enough space for new trees to cover 3.5 million square miles (9...
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FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2018 file photo, people walk in Tree Library park in Milan, Italy. The city has ambitious plans to plant 3 million new trees by 2030_ a move that experts say could offer relief to the city's muggy and sometimes tropical weather. A study released on Thursday, July 4, 2019 says that the most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees - a trillion of them, maybe more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
July 04, 2019 - 1:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A study says the best way to fight global warming is to plant a trillion trees — maybe more. Swiss scientists calculate that there's enough space to plant trees to cover 3.5 million square miles. That's roughly the size of the United States The study says those new trees could...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011, file photo, a lemur looks through the forest at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Andasibe, Madagascar. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso, File)
May 06, 2019 - 11:23 am
People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. But it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 10:25 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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