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Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, center left, greets a worker during a visit to the HS2 Solihull Interchange building site in Solihull, England, Friday, Sept. 4, 2020. Construction is set to formally begin on Britain’s 106 billion-pound ($140 billion) high-speed railway project, aiming to forge better connections between cities for decades to come. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps defended the project, which has its “shovels in the ground" moment just as the country is wondering whether the over-budget and often-delayed project offers good value at a time when the the COVID-19 pandemic has enshrined the idea of working from home. (Andrew Fox/Pool Photo via AP)
September 04, 2020 - 9:05 am
LONDON (AP) — Construction formally began Friday on Britain's 106 billion-pound ($140 billion) high-speed railway project, aiming to forge better connections between cities for decades to come. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps defended the HS2 project, which has its “shovels in the ground" moment...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 4, 2020 file photo, Waterloo station, one of the busiest train stations in Britain, is still much quieter than normal as most commuters are working from home and not commuting into central London offices due to the coronavirus outbreak, in London. The British government is encouraging workers to return to their offices amid concern that the number of people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic is hurting coffee bars, restaurants and other businesses in city centers. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said Friday, Aug. 28 that this is the right time for many people to return to work because children will be going back to school next week. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
August 28, 2020 - 2:39 pm
LONDON (AP) — The British government is encouraging workers to return to their offices amid concerns that the shift to working from home during the coronavirus pandemic is hurting coffee bars, restaurants and other businesses, leaving city centers virtual “ghost towns.” Prime Minister Boris Johnson...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2020 file photo, a man writes information in front of Illinois Department of Employment Security in Chicago. It's the paradox of a pandemic that has crushed the U.S. economy: There are 12.9 million job losses and a dangerous rash of closed business, yet the personal finances of many Americans have remained strong, and in some ways have even improved. A new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows that 45% of Americans say they’re setting aside more money than usual. Twenty-six percent are paying down debt faster than they were before the coronavirus pandemic. In total, about half of Americans say they’ve either saved more or paid down debt. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
August 25, 2020 - 7:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the paradox of a pandemic that has crushed the U.S. economy: 12.9 million people have lost a job and a dangerous rash of businesses has closed, yet the personal finances of many Americans have remained strong — and in some ways have even improved. A new poll from The...
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School employee Joel Barbas walk inside the empty Casa del Colibri school amid the new coronavirus pandemic, as students return to classes but not schools in Mexico City, Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. A system cobbling together online classes, instruction broadcast on cable television channels and radio programming in indigenous languages for the most remote, will attempt to keep students from missing out. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
August 24, 2020 - 4:55 pm
CONCORD, N.H. -- Mental health officials say children are a particular concern during the coronavirus pandemic both as patients and as offspring of providers working from home. The pandemic has exacerbated existing workforce challenges in behavioral health, Cynthia Whitaker, interim president of...
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A restaurant prepares delivery meal orders during lockdown due to the continuing spread of the coronavirus in Melbourne, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. Victoria state, Australia's coronavirus hot spot, announced on Monday that businesses will be closed and scaled down in a bid to curb the spread of the virus. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
August 17, 2020 - 7:31 pm
MELBOURNE — Australia’s coronavirus hot spot Victoria state on Tuesday reported its lowest tally of new infections in a month. Victoria’s Health Department reported 222 news cases, the lowest daily tally since 217 were recorded on July 18. The state also reported 17 deaths following a daily record...
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Vice President Rachel Zsembery at the design firm Bergmeyer, arranges lighting for zoom meetings, Wednesday, July 29, 2020, at the company's offices, in Boston. To reduce the risk of spreading the coronavirus, the firm implemented one-way routes throughout the office, added higher cubicle walls, requires masks when not at the desk, added hand sanitizer stations and put in lots of signs to make sure rules are clear. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
August 16, 2020 - 9:55 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Bergmeyer, a design firm in Boston, has erected higher cubicles, told employees to wear masks when not at their desks and set up one-way aisles in the office that force people to walk the long way around to get to the kitchen or the bathroom. “The one-way paths take me a little out...
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FILE - In this Friday, May 22, 2020, file photo, a sold sign sits in front of a house in Brighton, N.Y. The coronavirus pandemic helped shape the housing market by influencing everything from the direction of mortgage rates to the inventory of homes on the market to the types of homes in demand and the desired locations. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey, File)
August 14, 2020 - 2:07 am
NEW YORK (AP) — A renter most of his adult life, Clarence Swann became fearful that landlords would use the coronavirus pandemic as an excuse to gouge their tenants. So, with a desire to move near family, the retired veteran bought his first home last month at the age of 74. Swann said he used his...
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FILE - In this Thursday, July 2, 2020, file photo, cars drive under a sign greeting visitors near the entrance to Walt Disney World, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. A new television show about the residents and caretakers at Walt Disney World's Animal Kingdom is being produced by National Geographic and will start streaming in the fall of 2020 on the Disney+. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
August 12, 2020 - 10:01 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Walt Disney World and the union for its actors and singers reached an agreement on Wednesday that will allow them to return to work, more than a month after they said they were locked out of the reopening of the theme park resort for publicly demanding coronavirus tests. Disney...
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Megan Foster poses for a picture on the campus of the University of North Carolina-Charlotte on Saturday, Aug. 1, 2020, in Charlotte, N.C. The iconic summer job for high school and college students has been on the wane for nearly 20 years. But the pandemic is squeezing even more young people out of the workforce. Foster, a grad student, was unable to get a paid internship or summer job in her field of communications. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
August 11, 2020 - 9:56 am
Sara Buie lined up a summer lifeguard job to help pay for a new laptop, textbooks and a backpack for her freshman year at Virginia’s James Madison University. But the coronavirus pandemic closed her community pool. She tried offering online tutoring to middle school and high school students. But...
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FILE - In a July 26, 2017 file photo, McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook is interviewed at the New York Stock Exchange. McDonald’s is suing Easterbrook, the former CEO, saying he lied about relationships with employees and destroyed evidence before he was fired from the company in 2019. McDonald’s fired Easterbook last November after he admitted to an improper relationship with an employee, with whom he exchanged videos and text messages.(AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
August 10, 2020 - 8:33 am
McDonald’s says it's suing Stephen Easterbrook, the CEO it ousted last year over an inappropriate relationship with an employee, alleging Monday that he covered up relationships with other employees and destroyed evidence. Easterbrook, according to a lawsuit, approved a special grant of restricted...
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