Confirmation Hearings

In this May 5, 2020, photo, Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee during his nomination hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump’s pick to be the nation’s top intelligence official, Ratcliffe, is adamant that if confirmed he will not allow politics to color information he takes to the president. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)
May 21, 2020 - 7:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A sharply divided Senate confirmed John Ratcliffe as director of national intelligence on Thursday, with Democrats refusing to support the nomination over fears that he will politicize the intelligence community's work under President Donald Trump. All Democrats opposed Ratcliffe...
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In this May 5, 2020, photo, Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee during his nomination hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump’s pick to be the nation’s top intelligence official, Ratcliffe, is adamant that if confirmed he will not allow politics to color information he takes to the president. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)
May 05, 2020 - 11:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. John Ratcliffe, President Donald Trump's pick to be the nation's top intelligence official, was nothing if not consistent as he told lawmakers a dozen or so times that he wouldn't allow politics to color information he took to the president. The senators kept asking anyway as...
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Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee nomination hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May. 5, 2020. The panel is considering Ratcliffe's nomination for director of national intelligence. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)
May 05, 2020 - 7:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee for national intelligence director sought at his confirmation hearing Tuesday to shed his reputation as a loyalist to the president, insisting to skeptical Democrats that he would carry out the job free of political influence or partisan bias. The...
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This video framegrab image from MSNBC's Morning Joe, shows Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaking to co-host Mika Brzezinski, Friday, May 1, 2020. (MSNBC's Morning Joe via AP)
May 02, 2020 - 7:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — "Believe women" was never a call to believe all women automatically. That's what leading Democrats, including the prominent figures of the #MeToo movement, are suggesting as they stand behind former Vice President Joe Biden and his bid to unseat President Donald Trump. From House...
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This video framegrab image from MSNBC's Morning Joe, shows Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaking to co-host Mika Brzezinski, Friday, May 1, 2020. (MSNBC's Morning Joe via AP)
May 01, 2020 - 3:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — If Joe Biden was looking for a soft landing place to address sexual assault allegations made by a former Senate staffer, he didn't find it Friday on MSNBC's “Morning Joe.” The 20-minute interview of the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee conducted by Mika Brzezinski was...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at his campaign headquarters, Wednesday, March 4, 2020, in Burlington, Vt. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)
March 04, 2020 - 4:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — His front-runner status slipping, Bernie Sanders refocused his Democratic presidential campaign on surging rival Joe Biden on Wednesday as the Vermont senator's allies grappled with the fallout from a Super Tuesday stumble that raised internal concerns about the direction of his...
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FILE - This Nov. 30, 2018, file photo shows Chief Justice of the United States, John G. Roberts, as he sits with fellow Supreme Court justices for a group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. Roberts will move from the camera-free, relative anonymity of the Supreme Court to the glare of television lights in the Senate to preside over President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
December 23, 2019 - 5:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — America's last prolonged look at Chief Justice John Roberts came 14 years ago, when he told senators during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing that judges should be like baseball umpires, impartially calling balls and strikes. “Nobody ever went to a ballgame to see the umpire...
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The Senate side of the Capitol is seen on the morning after the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi refused to say Wednesday night when she'll send the impeachment articles against Trump to the Senate for the trial. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 22, 2019 - 11:58 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The night before the whistleblower complaint that launched President Donald Trump's impeachment was made public, Democrats and Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee crammed into the same room to get a first look at the document. For Democrats, it was an instant bombshell...
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In this Dec. 18, 2019, photo, President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Battle Creek, Mich. Using stark “Us versus Them” language, Trump and his campaign are trying to frame impeachment not as judgment on his conduct but as a culture war referendum on him and his supporters, aiming to motivate his base heading into an election year (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
December 22, 2019 - 6:45 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Using stark “us vs. them” language, President Donald Trump and his reelection campaign have begun framing his impeachment not as a judgment on his conduct but as a referendum on how Democrats regard him and his supporters. Mere days from the start of an election year, the White...
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Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan appears before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee for his confirmation hearing to be the new U.S. ambassador to Russia, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019. President Donald Trump's nominee faced questions about Russian election interference and the ouster of the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine at his Senate confirmation hearing. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
October 30, 2019 - 2:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The No. 2 official at the State Department faced off Wednesday with senators demanding to know why he didn't know more about the Trump administration's backchannel diplomacy with Ukraine and the dismissal of the former U.S. ambassador to Kyiv, issues now at the heart of the...
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