Corporate legal affairs

In this Aug. 17, 2018 photo, Stamford Police stand outside the headquarters of Purdue Pharma, which is owned by the Sackler family, in Stamford, Conn. The Sackler family came under scrutiny when a legal filing in Massachusetts gave detailed allegations of how family members and other Purdue Pharma executives sought to push prescriptions for the drug OxyContin and downplay its addiction risks. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
January 18, 2019 - 12:56 pm
The legal pressure on the prominent family behind the company that makes OxyContin, the prescription painkiller that helped fuel the nation's opioid epidemic, is likely to get more intense. The Sackler family came under heavy scrutiny this week when a legal filing in a Massachusetts case asserted...
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January 17, 2019 - 1:58 pm
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Workers who sued General Motors after nooses and racist graffiti were found at its largest U.S. transmission plant nearly two years ago are still facing racial harassment, their attorney said Thursday. Just this week, one of the workers found a monkey doll and a racist drawing...
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FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2018 file photo, with a downed power utility pole in the foreground, Eric England, right, searches through a friend's vehicle after the wildfire burned through Paradise, Calif. Facing potentially colossal liabilities over deadly California wildfires, PG&E will file for bankruptcy protection. The announcement Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, follows the resignation of the power company’s chief executive. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
January 15, 2019 - 7:50 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Pacific Gas & Electric Co. said this week it will file for bankruptcy, raising concern that rates for electricity and gas will rise and victims of California wildfires who are suing the nation's largest utility won't get all the money they may be owed. Here are some...
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FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2018 file photo, Pacific Gas & Electric crews work to restore power lines in Paradise, Calif. Facing potentially colossal liabilities over deadly California wildfires, PG&E will file for bankruptcy protection. The announcement Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, follows the resignation of the power company’s chief executive. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
January 15, 2019 - 12:42 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The announcement by the nation's largest utility that it is filing for bankruptcy puts Pacific Gas & Electric Co.'s problems squarely in the hands of Gov. Gavin Newsom and state lawmakers, who now must try to keep ratepayer costs down, ensure wildfire victims get the...
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In this image taken from a video footage run by China's CCTV, Canadian Robert Lloyd Schellenberg attends his retrial at the Dalian Intermediate People's Court in Dalian, northeastern China's Liaoning province on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. A Chinese court sentenced the Canadian man to death Monday in a sudden retrial in a drug smuggling case that is likely to escalate tensions between the countries over the arrest of a top Chinese technology executive. (CCTV via AP)
January 14, 2019 - 7:35 pm
TORONTO (AP) — A Chinese court sentenced a Canadian man to death in a sudden retrial of a drug smuggling case and Beijing said that it has denied a Canadian diplomatic immunity, ratcheting up tensions since Canada's arrest of a top Chinese technology executive last month. A Chinese court in...
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January 14, 2019 - 10:34 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A leading House Democrat is announcing a sweeping investigation of the pharmaceutical industry's pricing practices. Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings said Monday that he's sent letters to 12 major drug manufacturers seeking detailed information and documents...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2018, file photo, Jose Munoz, then head of Nissan's China operations, speaks during an interview in Shanghai. Nissan Chief Performance Officer Munoz, who took a leave of absence a week ago, is leaving, the first high-profile departure at the Japanese automaker publicly acknowledged as related to the arrest of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn, Munoz said in a statement on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019. (AP Photo, File)
January 11, 2019 - 7:53 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Nissan Chief Performance Officer Jose Munoz, who took a leave of absence a week ago, is leaving, the first high-profile departure at the Japanese automaker publicly acknowledged as related to the arrest of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn. Munoz said in a statement on LinkedIn Saturday he...
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FILE - In this May 6, 2014, file photo, a vehicle moves past a sign outside Fiat Chrysler Automobiles world headquarters in Auburn Hills, Mich. Fiat Chrysler will pay more than $650 million to settle allegations that it cheated on emissions tests involving more than 104,000 Jeep SUVs and Ram pickup trucks, a person with the knowledge of the settlement told The Associated Press on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
January 09, 2019 - 7:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fiat Chrysler will pay more than $650 million to settle allegations that it cheated on emissions tests involving more than 104,000 Jeep SUVs and Ram pickup trucks, a person with the knowledge of the settlement told The Associated Press on Wednesday. The Italian-American automaker...
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In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018 photo, from left, attorneys David Seligman, Nina DiSalvo and Alexander Hood of Denver's Towards Justice are shown outside the organization's office east of downtown Denver. A deal filed in federal court in Denver Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019, will allow young people who have provided low-cost child care for American families to share in a $65.5-million class action settlement with the companies that brought the workers to the United States. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
January 09, 2019 - 5:49 pm
DENVER (AP) — Young people from around the world who provided low-cost child care for American families will share in a proposed $65.5 million settlement of a lawsuit brought by a dozen former au pairs against the companies that bring the workers to the United States. Nearly 100,000 au pairs,...
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FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2018, file photo, victims of Japan's forced labor and their family members arrive at the Supreme Court in Seoul, South Korea. A South Korean district court said Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019, it has decided to freeze the local assets of a Japanese company involved in compensation disputes for wartime Korean laborers. The sign reads " Mitsubishi Heavy Industries apologize and compensate victims." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
January 09, 2019 - 4:10 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A South Korean court said Wednesday it has ordered the seizure of local assets of a Japanese company after it refused to compensate several wartime forced laborers, in an escalation of a diplomatic brawl between the Asian neighbors. Japan called the decision "extremely...
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