Earth science

In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 4:58 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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FILE - In this April 12, 2019, file photo, Sidney Draughon holds a sign as she takes part in a protest in Provo, Utah, against how the Brigham Young University Honor Code Office investigates and disciplines students. Two well-known scientific groups have dropped job postings from their websites from Brigham Young University, the Salt Lake Tribune reported Monday, Nov. 11, 2019, because of the school's LGBTQ policies, igniting a debate on whether research organizations should take a stance on social issues. Both groups say the ads require applicants to abide by the school's honor code, which includes a ban on homosexual behavior. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
November 11, 2019 - 2:35 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Two well-known scientific groups have dropped job postings from their websites from Brigham Young University because of the school's LGBTQ policies, igniting a debate on whether research organizations should take a stance on social issues. The Washington-based American...
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Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks after a climate change march in Los Angeles, on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. Thunberg says young people are rallying to fight climate change because their age leaves them with the most to lose from damage to the planet. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
November 02, 2019 - 8:41 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Greta Thunberg, Sweden's 16-year-old climate-change activist, joined fellow teenagers from throughout California Friday in telling a cheering crowd of hundreds at a Los Angeles rally that they can and will fight to save their planet from global warming. Thunberg, who has been...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
October 29, 2019 - 11:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Chris Lene sweeps water out of one of the businesses in the building he owns that was flooded by rainwater in Sacramento, Calif. Climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet, according a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
October 21, 2019 - 2:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet. Scientists looked at 33 El Ninos since 1901. This natural weather phenomenon is the warming of equatorial Pacific that triggers weather extremes...
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FILE - This Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011 NOAA satellite image shows Hurricane Irene, a category 2 storm with winds up to 100 mph and located about 400 miles southeast of Nassau. According to a study published Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists have discovered a real life mash-up of two feared disasters _ hurricanes and earthquakes _ called “stormquakes.” It’s a shaking of the sea floor during a hurricane or nor’easter that rumbles like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake. It’s a fairly common natural occurrence that wasn’t noticed before because it was in the seismic background noise. (Weather Underground via AP)
October 16, 2019 - 10:48 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have discovered a mash-up of two feared disasters — hurricanes and earthquakes. They're calling them "stormquakes." It's a shaking of the sea floor during a hurricane or nor'easter that rumbles like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake. The quakes are fairly common, but they...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 4:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down power...
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Pope Francis celebrates an opening Mass for the Amazon synod, in St. Peter's Basilica, at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019. Pope Francis is opening a divisive meeting on preserving the Amazon and ministering to its indigenous peoples, as he fends off attacks from conservatives who are opposed to his ecological agenda.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
October 06, 2019 - 3:40 am
VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis on Sunday opened a divisive meeting on preserving the Amazon and ministering to its indigenous peoples as he fended off attacks from conservatives who are opposed to his ecological agenda. Francis celebrated an opening Mass in St. Peter's Basilica with global...
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In this undated photo provided by NOAA, William Lapenta poses at the Weather Prediction Center, in College Park, Md. Lapenta, a federal scientist who oversaw weather prediction centers that track ocean, hurricane and even space conditions died Monday, Sept. 30, 2019, after lifeguards pulled him from the surf in rough seas on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. (NOAA via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 2:13 pm
DUCK, N.C. (AP) — A top weather forecasting official, who oversaw the government’s prediction centers that track ocean, hurricane and even space conditions, has died in rough seas on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. William Lapenta, 58, died Monday after lifeguards pulled him from the surf off the...
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