Education costs

FILE - In this Wednesday, March 18, 2020, file photo, people remove belongings on campus at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C., amid the coronavirus pandemic. As more universities keep classes online this fall, it’s leading to conflict between students who say they deserve tuition discounts and college leaders who insist remote learning is worth the full cost. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
August 22, 2020 - 11:49 am
As more universities abandon plans to reopen and decide instead to keep classes online this fall, it's leading to conflict between students who say they deserve tuition discounts and college leaders who insist remote learning is worth the full cost. Disputes are flaring both at colleges that...
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FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2019, file photo, South Carolina running back Deshaun Fenwick warms up prior to an NCAA college football game against North Carolina in Charlotte, N.C. For the college athletes who are heading into a season of uncertainty brought on by COVID-19, the NCAA's decision to not charge them a year of eligibility, no matter how much they play, brings peace of mind. (AP Photo/Nell Redmond, File)
August 21, 2020 - 3:17 pm
For the college athletes who are heading into a season of uncertainty brought on by COVID-19, the NCAA's decision to not charge them a year of eligibility — no matter how much they play — brings peace of mind. And happy parents. “My mom’s more excited about it than I am,” said running back Deshaun...
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President Donald Trump signs an executive order during a news conference at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Saturday, Aug. 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
August 09, 2020 - 6:28 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump's new executive orders to help Americans struggling under the economic recession are far less sweeping than any pandemic relief bill Congress would pass. Trump acted Saturday after negotiations for a second pandemic relief bill reached an impasse. Democrats...
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August 07, 2020 - 2:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer borrowing rose in June after three months of declines but the key category of credit card debt extended its decline. The Federal Reserve reported Friday that overall consumer borrowing rose by 2.6%, or $8.95 billion, in June after big declines in March, April and May...
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FILE - In this July 23, 2019, file photo, Jay-Z makes an announcement of the launch of Dream Chasers record label in joint venture with Roc Nation, at the Roc Nation headquarters in New York. Jay-Z’s Roc Nation entertainment company is partnering with Brooklyn’s Long Island University to launch the Roc Nation School of Music, Sports & Entertainment. The new school will begin enrolling students for the fall 2021 semester, and 25% of the incoming freshmen class will receive Roc Nation Hope Scholarships. (Photo by Greg Allen/Invision/AP, File)
August 04, 2020 - 9:55 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Jay-Z’s Roc Nation entertainment company is partnering with Brooklyn’s Long Island University to launch the Roc Nation School of Music, Sports & Entertainment. The new school will begin enrolling students for the fall 2021 semester, and 25% of the incoming freshmen class will...
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Mondaire Jones, winner of the Democratic primary for the 17th Congressional District, addresses a Black Lives Matter rally, Wednesday, July 15, 2020, outside the Westchester County courthouse in White Plains, N.Y. If he wins in November, Jones will join a record number of openly-LGBTQ elected officials in the United States. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
July 16, 2020 - 7:17 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The number of openly LGBTQ elected officials in the United States has more than doubled in the past four years — and those ranks could soon grow, thanks to a record field of LGBTQ candidates this year, according to new data from an advocacy and research group. The LGBTQ Victory...
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FILE - In this June 10, 2020 file photo, Jovita Carranza, Administrator of the Small Business Administration, testifies during a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship hearing to examine implementation of Title I of the CARES Act, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Treasury Department said it is releasing on Monday, July 6 the names of more than 700,000 companies that received funds from the government’s small business lending program, a massive effort intended to support the economy as states shut down in April to contain the viral outbreak. (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP, File)
July 06, 2020 - 2:17 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the Treasury decision to identify hundreds of thousands of businesses that received funding through the Paycheck Protection Program, created to preserve jobs at smaller businesses during the coronavirus pandemic: ___ Kanye West’s clothing and sneaker brand Yeezy...
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FILE - In this June 27, 2020, file photo, Saltillo High School seniors make their way to the football field as the sun begins to set for their graduation ceremony in Saltillo, Miss. The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher education. (Thomas Wells/The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal via AP, File)
July 05, 2020 - 11:26 pm
The number of high school seniors applying for U.S. federal college aid plunged in the weeks following the sudden closure of school buildings this spring — a time when students were cut off from school counselors, and families hit with financial setbacks were reconsidering plans for higher...
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The U.S. Supreme Court is seen Tuesday, June 30, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
June 30, 2020 - 5:07 pm
The Supreme Court elated religious freedom advocates and alarmed secular groups with its Tuesday ruling on public funding for religious education, a decision whose long-term effect on the separation of church and state remains to be seen. In Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, the high court...
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The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, early Monday, June 15, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 30, 2020 - 12:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — States can't cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. By a 5-4 vote with the conservatives in the majority, the justices upheld a Montana scholarship program that allows state tax credits for private...
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