Education costs

President Donald Trump's budget request for fiscal year 2021 arrives at the House Budget Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Feb. 10, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
February 10, 2020 - 4:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump unveiled a $4.8 trillion election year budget plan on Monday that recycles deep, previously rejected cuts to domestic programs like food stamps, Medicaid, and housing as the recipe for wrestling the federal budget back into balance. Trump’s fiscal 2021 plan...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a campaign event, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, in Derry, N.H. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
February 07, 2020 - 4:21 am
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — Elizabeth Warren's path to victory may have to go through fellow progressive Bernie Sanders. And after Sanders' strong showing in Iowa, that path became far more difficult heading into Tuesday's New Hampshire primary. The challenge for Warren is to somehow outshine Sanders...
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This July 31, 2019 photo shows Stillwater Christian School parents Jeri Anderson and Kendra Espinoza at Woodland Park in Kalispell, Mont. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 in a dispute over a Montana scholarship program for private K-12 education that also makes donors eligible for up to $150 in state tax credits. Advocates on both sides say the outcome could be momentous because it could lead to efforts in other states to funnel taxpayer money to religious schools. (Casey Kreider/The Daily Inter Lake via AP)
January 18, 2020 - 9:19 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Supreme Court that seems more favorable to religion-based discrimination claims is set to hear a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling in many states. The justices will hear arguments Wednesday in a dispute over a Montana scholarship...
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California Gov. Gavin Newsom gestures toward a chart showing the growth of the state's rainy day fund as he discusses his proposed 2020-2021 state budget during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Jan. 10, 2020.. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
January 10, 2020 - 7:53 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's governor revealed a spending plan on Friday that puts a new tax on vaping, gives $20,000 to teachers who commit to working in high-needs schools and gives taxpayer-funded health benefits to older adults living in the country illegally. Gov. Gavin Newsom's $222...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, file photo, the U.S. Capitol is seen as the sun sets in Washington. Negotiations on a package of spending bills to fund the federal government have produced a key breakthrough, though considerably more work is needed to wrap up the long-delayed measures. Top lawmakers of the House and Senate Appropriations committees on Saturday, Nov. 23, confirmed agreement on allocations for each of the 12 spending bills. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
December 17, 2019 - 2:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A raft of expired and expiring tax breaks, including deductions for mortgage insurance premiums, college tuition and large medical bills, would be renewed under a massive government-wide funding bill approved by the Democratic-controlled House. The action comes a few days before...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by NerdWallet shows Liz Weston, a columnist for personal finance website NerdWallet.com. (NerdWallet via AP, File)
KNSS News
December 02, 2019 - 10:18 am
Many of us feel bad about our debt. Most of us probably shouldn’t. Three-quarters of U.S. households owe money, but the vast majority pay their bills on time and have debt loads that are reasonable given their incomes. But many people still report being embarrassed about owing money. In one study,...
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In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019 photo, a memorial plaque for eleven concertgoers killed at a 1979 concert stands between Great American Ballpark and Heritage Bank Arena, in Cincinnati. Tragedy four decades ago linked the British rock band The Who to a small suburban city in Ohio. In recent years, members of the community and the band have bonded through a project to memorialize the three teens from Finneytown who were killed in a frantic stampede of people trying to get into The Who’s Dec. 3, 1979, Cincinnati concert. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
December 02, 2019 - 12:37 am
FINNEYTOWN, Ohio (AP) — The concrete bench in a small northern Cincinnati suburb depicts a guitar, with the message “My Generation” just below it. In the background are plaques with the faces of three teenagers, Jackie Eckerle, Karen Morrison and Stephan Preston, frozen in time 40 years ago. Bricks...
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This photo provided by the University of Mississippi shows University of Mississippi student Arielle Hudson. Hudson has become the University of Mississippi’s 27th Rhodes Scholar. (Thomas Graning/Ole Miss Digital Imaging Services via AP)
November 24, 2019 - 12:50 pm
Minorities make up the majority of the latest group of U.S. college students to be named Rhodes Scholars, and the class includes the first transgender woman selected for the prestigious program. The Rhodes Trust announced the 32 selections late Saturday after two days of discussions over 236...
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FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo, U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper talks to the media with Qatar Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense Khalid Al Attiyah at the Pentagon in Washington. Barely four months into his tenure, Esper is making his second trek across the Pacific. And yet it is the Middle East – most recently a near-war with Iran and an actual war in Syria – that in Washington commands more attention and demands more American troops. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
November 14, 2019 - 2:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Mark Esper has issued new guidelines that will allow athletes attending the nation's military academies to seek waivers to delay their service and play professional sports immediately upon their graduation. A memo signed Friday by Esper requires athletes going...
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FILE - In this June 5, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies during a Senate Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations in Washington. Facing a federal lawsuit and mounting pressure to act, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, said she will forgive loans for more than 1,500 borrowers who attended a pair of for-profit colleges that shut down last year. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
November 08, 2019 - 2:08 pm
Facing a federal lawsuit and mounting pressure to act, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Friday said she will forgive loans for more than 1,500 borrowers who attended a pair of for-profit colleges that shut down last year. Students who attended the Art Institute of Colorado and the Illinois...
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