Emergency management

Barber and owner of Chris Edwards, left, wears a mask and cuts the hair of customer at Peachtree Battle Barber Shop in Atlanta on Friday, April 24, 2020. The first phase of Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp's plan to reopen Georgia during the coronavirus pandemic included haircut shops and gyms, though not all chose to open their doors. (John Spink/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)
KNSS News
April 24, 2020 - 7:59 pm
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Even as the confirmed U.S. death toll from the coronavirus soared past 50,000, Georgia, Oklahoma and Alaska began loosening lockdown orders Friday on their pandemic-wounded businesses, despite warnings from health experts that the gradual steps toward normalcy might be...
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President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Thursday, April 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
April 24, 2020 - 11:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed a $484 billion bill Friday to aid employers and hospitals under stress from the coronavirus pandemic that has killed more than 50,000 Americans and devastated broad swaths of the economy. The bill is the latest effort by the federal government to help...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019 file photo, a flag at the World War II Memorial flies upside down after it unclipped from its snaphook, before sunrise on Capitol Hill in Washington. At right is the Washington Monument. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
April 24, 2020 - 5:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — What if the real “invisible enemy” is the enemy from within — America's very institutions? When the coronavirus pandemic came from distant lands to the United States, it was met with cascading failures and incompetencies by a system that exists to prepare, protect, prevent and cut...
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People line up to fill in forms before getting tested for the coronavirus in Prague, Czech Republic, Thursday, April 23, 2020. Czechs have been forming long lines to get tested in a study to determine undetected infections with the coronavirus in the population. Some 27,000 people aged 18 - 89 across the country will be tested in the next two weeks, starting on Thursday. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
April 23, 2020 - 10:14 pm
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — Las Vegas Strip hotel-casino makes plans to reopen...
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FILE - In this May 5, 2018, file photo, Mike Smith rides Justify to victory during the 144th running of the Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. The move of the Triple Crown’s first leg to Labor Day weekend due to the coronavirus pandemic will mark the first time the Derby won’t run on the first Saturday in May since 1945. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, File)
April 23, 2020 - 6:36 pm
The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ The governor of North Carolina is still considering a request to allow NASCAR to race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in May. Gov. Roy Cooper on Thursday extended the state’s stay-at-home order because of the...
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In this image from video, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks on the floor of the House of Representatives at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, April 23, 2020. (House Television via AP)
April 23, 2020 - 5:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress delivered a nearly $500 billion infusion of coronavirus spending Thursday, rushing new relief to employers and hospitals buckling under the strain of a pandemic that has claimed almost 50,000 American lives and one in six U.S. jobs. The measure passed almost unanimously,...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2020, file photo, wearing protective masks ground crew at the Los Angeles International airport unload supplies of medical personal protective equipment from a China Southern Cargo plane. Before the coronavirus outbreak, many states had only a modest supply of medical equipment. An Associated Press review of more than 20 states found that many were still storing items that were left over from an influenza pandemic a decade ago and long since expired. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
April 23, 2020 - 4:36 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo (AP) — Last autumn, when schools were in session, sports stadiums full and no one had even heard of the COVID-19 disease, the Missouri health department made an eerily foreshadowing request. It asked the state for $300,000 to buy supplies in case of a large-scale disease outbreak...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020 file photo, vaping devices are displayed at a store in New York. On Thursday, April 23, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said that a federal court accepted its request to push back the May 12 deadline to submit vaping product applications to Sept. 9. The agency said the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed preparations to meet the deadline for both companies and FDA staff. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
April 23, 2020 - 1:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Electronic cigarette companies will have four additional months to submit their products for government review because of delays tied to the coronavirus outbreak. The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that a federal court accepted its request to push back the May 12...
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Protesters drive by in a convertible car during a rally calling for an end to California Gov. Gavin Newsom's stay-at-home orders amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, outside of City Hall in downtown Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
April 23, 2020 - 1:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — For weeks, the Trump administration played up the dangers of the coronavirus as it sought to persuade Americans to disrupt their lives and stay home. Now, as President Donald Trump aims for a swift nationwide reopening, he faces a new challenge: convincing people it's safe to come...
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FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2019, file photo, students walk past the statue of John Harvard in Harvard Yard at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Wednesday, April 22, 2020, urged the nation's richest colleges, including Harvard, to reject federal funding that was allotted to them in the government's multi-trillion dollar coronavirus rescue package. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
KNSS News
April 22, 2020 - 9:25 pm
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Harvard University announced Wednesday it will turn down $8.7 million in federal coronavirus relief, a day after President Donald Trump excoriated the wealthy Ivy League school over taxpayer money it stood to receive. Similar action was taken at Stanford, Princeton and Yale...
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