Energy and utilities regulation

September 28, 2020 - 8:01 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — U.S. Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler on Monday ridiculed California Gov. Gavin Newsom's plan to ban the sale of new gas-powered cars by 2035, saying the proposal raises “significant questions of legality.” Last week, Newsom signed an executive order...
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This Sept. 14, 2020 photo shows shows a Duke Energy natural gas-fired electric power plant on Sutton Lake in Wilmington, N.C. It went online in 2013 and replaced a coal-fired plant that had polluted the lake with coal ash. Sutton Lake is among a number of man-made reservoirs in the U.S. that environmentalists say will lose federal protection from pollution under a Trump administration revision of the Clean Water Act that took effect this year. (AP Photo/John Flesher)
September 27, 2020 - 8:33 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Nearly 50 years ago, a power company received permission from North Carolina to build a reservoir by damming a creek near the coastal city of Wilmington. It would provide a source of steam to generate electricity and a place to cool hot water from an adjacent coal-fired...
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President Donald Trump does a little dance after speaking at a campaign rally Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, in Newport News, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
September 26, 2020 - 7:42 am
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — President Donald Trump's campaign has grown increasingly focused on making inroads in Pennsylvania to offset potential vulnerabilities in other battlegrounds. The president will travel to the state for the second time in a week on Saturday, hoping to attract the same rural...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2020, file photo, William Perry Pendley, acting director of the Bureau of Land Management, speaks to the media on the Grizzly Creek Fire in Eagle, Colo. A federal judge has ruled that the Trump administration's leading steward of public lands has been serving unlawfully and blocked him from continuing in the position. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris said Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, that U.S. Bureau of Land Management acting director William Perry Pendley was never confirmed to the post by the U.S. Senate and served unlawfully for 424 days. Montana's Democratic governor had sued to remove Pendley, saying the the former oil industry attorney was illegally overseeing a government agency that manages almost a quarter-billion acres of land, primarily in the U.S. West. (Chris Dillmann/Vail Daily via AP, File)
September 25, 2020 - 7:46 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal judge ruled Friday that President Donald Trump's leading steward of public lands has been serving unlawfully, blocking him from continuing in the position in the latest pushback against the administration's practice of filling key positions without U.S. Senate...
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California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks at a press conference on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, at Cal Expo in Sacramento where he announced an executive order requiring the sale of all new passenger vehicles to be zero-emission by 2035, a move the governor says would achieve a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. California would be the first state with such a rule, though Germany and France are among 15 other countries that have a similar requirement. (Daniel Kim/The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool)
KNSS News
September 24, 2020 - 7:29 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will ban the sale of new gasoline-powered passenger cars and trucks in 15 years, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday, establishing a timeline in the nation's most populous state that could force U.S. automakers to shift their zero-emission efforts into...
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Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., center, speaks next to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., left, and House Majority Whip James Clyburn, of S.C., during a news conference about COVID-19, Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
September 24, 2020 - 4:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The House has approved a modest bill to promote “clean energy” and increase energy efficiency while phasing out the use of coolants in air conditioners and refrigerators that are considered a major driver of global warming. The bill boosts renewable energy such as solar and wind...
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FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2017 file photo, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks at Stanford University in Stanford, Calif. The Supreme Court says Ginsburg has died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at age 87. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
September 18, 2020 - 11:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (all times local): 12:05 a.m. Saturday Former President Barack Obama is calling Ruth Bader Ginsburg “a relentless litigator and an incisive jurist” who “inspired generations, from the tiniest trick-or-treaters to...
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FILE - Republican Ohio state Rep. Larry Householder sits at the head of a legislative session as Speaker of the House, in Columbus, Ohio, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019. Householder, who is accused in a $60 million federal bribery probe, was removed from his leadership position on July 30, 2020. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
September 03, 2020 - 1:35 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The former speaker of the Ohio House pleaded not guilty Thursday to a federal corruption charge tied to an alleged $60 million bribery scheme. Republican Rep. Larry Householder and four others are accused of shepherding $60 million in energy company money for personal and...
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September 02, 2020 - 4:53 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — U.S. officials have for the first time approved a design for a small commercial nuclear reactor, and a Utah energy cooperative wants to build 12 of them in Idaho. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Friday approved Portland-based NuScale Power’s application for the small...
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FILE - In this Dec. 20, 2019 file photo, construction is underway at the Lusail Stadium, one of the 2022 World Cup stadiums, in Lusail, Qatar. A U.N. labor body says new labor rules in the energy-rich nation of Qatar “effectively dismantles” the country’s long-criticized “kafala” employment system. The International Labor Organization said Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020, that as of now, migrant workers can change jobs before the end of their contracts without obtaining the permission of their current employers. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)
August 30, 2020 - 7:44 pm
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — New labor rules in the energy-rich nation of Qatar “effectively dismantles” the country's long-criticized “kafala” employment system, a U.N. labor body said Sunday. The International Labor Organization said as of now, migrant workers can change jobs before the end...
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