Engineering

This combination of photos provided by the City of Virginia Beach on Saturday, June 1, 2019 shows victims of Friday's shooting at a municipal building in Virginia Beach, Va. Top row from left are Laquita C. Brown, Ryan Keith Cox, Tara Welch Gallagher and Mary Louise Gayle. Middle row from left are Alexander Mikhail Gusev, Joshua O. Hardy, Michelle "Missy" Langer and Richard H. Nettleton. Bottom row from left are Katherine A. Nixon, Christopher Kelly Rapp, Herbert "Bert" Snelling and Robert "Bobby" Williams. (Courtesy City of Virginia Beach via AP)
June 02, 2019 - 1:25 am
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (AP) — Four were engineers who worked to maintain streets and protect wetlands. Three were right-of-way agents who reviewed property lines. The others included an account clerk, a technician, an administrative assistant and a special projects coordinator. In all, they had served...
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Homes are flooded near the Arkansas River in Tulsa, Okla., on Friday, May 24, 2019. The threat of potentially devastating flooding continued Friday along the Arkansas River from Tulsa into western Arkansas. (Tom Gilbert/Tulsa World via AP)
May 28, 2019 - 5:54 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Historic flooding is hitting communities along the Arkansas River despite little rain in the region, thanks to downpours in areas father north and efforts by officials to control the powerful surge of water. Intense rain in Kansas and northeast Oklahoma strained aging dams...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' commanding officer has endorsed a $778 million plan for upgrading a lock-and-dam complex near Chicago to prevent Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes. Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite signed the final report Thursday, May 23, 2019. It now goes to Congress, which would need to give authorization and funding for the project to proceed. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
May 24, 2019 - 3:16 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The head of the Army Corps of Engineers has sent Congress a $778 million plan to fortify an Illinois waterway with noisemakers, electric cables and other devices in the hope that they will prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes, where the aggressive invaders...
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A worker walks past tornado-damaged Toyotas at a dealership in Jefferson City, Mo., Thursday, May 23, 2019, after a tornado tore though late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
May 24, 2019 - 1:47 am
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — An outbreak of nasty storms spawned tornadoes that razed homes, flattened trees and tossed cars across a dealership lot, injuring about two dozen people in Missouri's capital city and killing at least three others elsewhere in the state. The National Weather Service...
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People re-created the historic photo of the meeting of the rails from May 10, 1869, during the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad completion at the Golden Spike National Historical Park Friday, May 10, 2019, in Promontory, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
May 10, 2019 - 6:34 pm
PROMONTORY, Utah (AP) — Music, bells and cannon fire rang out Friday at a remote spot in the Utah desert where the final spikes of the Transcontinental Railroad were hammered 150 years ago, uniting a nation long separated by vast expanses of desert, mountains and forests and fresh off the Civil War...
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FILE - In this file photo taken Feb. 21, 2019, seventh grade students from Grace Academy in Hartford, Conn., work together on a robot using plans on a computer at the Connecticut Science Center in Hartford. Though less likely to study in a formal technology or engineering course, America's girls are showing more mastery of those subjects than their boy classmates, according to newly released national education data made public Tuesday, April 30, 2019. (Jim Michaud/Journal Inquirer via AP, File)
April 30, 2019 - 12:25 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Though less likely to study in a formal technology or engineering course, America's girls are showing more mastery of those subjects than their boy classmates, according to newly released national education data. Known as "The Nation's Report Card," the latest findings made public...
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Toyota’s basketball robot Cue 3 demonstrates Monday, April 1, 2019 at a gymnasium in Fuchu, Tokyo. The 207-centimeter (six-foot-10) -tall machine made five of eight three-pointer shots in a demonstration in a Tokyo suburb Monday, a ratio its engineers say is worse than usual. Toyota Motor Corp.’s robot, called Cue 3, computes as a three-dimensional image where the basket is, using sensors on its torso, and adjusts motors inside its arm and knees to give the shot the right angle and propulsion for a swish.(AP Photo/Yuri Kageyama)
April 01, 2019 - 1:26 am
TOKYO (AP) — It can't dribble, let alone slam dunk, but Toyota's basketball robot hardly ever misses a free throw or a 3-pointer. The 207-centimeter (six-foot, 10-inch)-tall machine made five of eight 3-point shots in a demonstration in a Tokyo suburb Monday, a ratio its engineers say is worse than...
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Workplace bullying claimant David Hingst covers his face as he leaves the Court of Appeal in Melbourne, Australia Friday, March 29, 2019. The Australian appeals court on Friday dismissed a bullying case brought by the engineer Hingst who accused his former supervisor of repeatedly breaking wind toward him. (Ellen Smith/AAP Image via AP)
March 29, 2019 - 2:29 am
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — An Australian appeals court on Friday dismissed a bullying case brought by an engineer who accused his former supervisor of repeatedly breaking wind toward him. The Victoria state Court of Appeal upheld a Supreme Court judge's ruling that even if engineer David Hingst's...
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March 25, 2019 - 10:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to begin planning and building 57 miles of 18-foot-high fencing in Yuma, Arizona, and El Paso, Texas, along the U.S. border with Mexico. The Pentagon says it will divert up to $1 billion to...
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FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, the closed LTV Steel taconite plant is abandoned near Hoyt Lakes, Minn. The Army Corps of Engineers has awarded the planned PolyMet copper-nickel mine in northeastern Minnesota the final permit it needs to proceed. The permit deals with how PolyMet will mitigate its effects on wetlands. PolyMet calls it a "historic achievement" that will let it move forward with Minnesota's first copper-nickel mine. Minnesota regulators issued the other key permits for the project last year, but the mine still faces court challenges. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
March 22, 2019 - 3:24 pm
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — PolyMet Mining Corp. has received the final permit it needs to proceed with building Minnesota's first copper-nickel mine, the company and the Army Corps of Engineers announced Friday. The Corps said it issued the permit late Tuesday. It deals with the steps PolyMet must take...
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