Environment

May 23, 2019 - 12:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate John Delaney is the latest 2020 contender to come out with a climate change plan, and he's proposing a fee on carbon emissions that he says aims reduce them by 90% by midcentury. That idea is part of the former Maryland congressman's $4 trillion...
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FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file photo elephants drink water in the Chobe National Park in Botswana. Botswana's government says it has lifted its ban on elephant hunting, a decision that is likely to bring protests from wildlife protection groups. (AP Photo/Charmaine Noronha, File)
May 23, 2019 - 10:21 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Botswana has lifted its ban on elephant hunting in a country with the world's highest number of the animals, a decision that has brought anger from some wildlife protection groups and warnings of a blow to lucrative tourism. The southern African nation is home to an estimated...
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May 23, 2019 - 5:02 am
BERLIN (AP) — German prosecutors have fined auto components and technology company Robert Bosch GmbH 90 million euros ($100 million) over its role in the diesel emissions scandal that erupted at Volkswagen in 2015. Prosecutors in Stuttgart said Wednesday that Bosch was fined for a negligent...
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FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a truck carrying 250 tons of coal hauls the fuel to the surface of the Spring Creek mine near Decker, Mont. Federal officials say the Trump administration's decision to lift a moratorium on coal sales from public lands could hasten the release of more than 5 billion tons of greenhouse gasses. The report comes after a court ruled last month that the administration failed to consider the environmental effects of its resumption in 2017 of coal sales. A moratorium had been imposed under President Barack Obama over worries about climate change. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
May 22, 2019 - 8:23 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to lift a moratorium on coal sales from public lands could hasten the release of more than 5 billion tons of greenhouse gases, but officials concluded Wednesday it would make little difference in overall U.S. climate emissions. That...
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May 22, 2019 - 6:34 pm
READING, Pa. (AP) — A federal bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved the sale of the 150-year-old Reading Eagle to a publisher known for its aggressive cost-cutting. MediaNews Group, better known as Digital First Media, offered $5 million for the assets of the Reading Eagle Co., which filed for...
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In this Friday, May 17, 2019 photo, a sea dragon swims at the Birch Aquarium at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego in San Diego. The Southern California aquarium has built what is believed to be one of the world's largest habitats for the surreal and mythical sea dragons outside Australia, where the native populations are threatened by pollution, warming oceans and the illegal pet and alternative medicine trades. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
May 22, 2019 - 8:34 am
LA JOLLA, California (AP) — At first glance, it looks like a branch of kelp, but then an eye moves among its leafy appendages, and ridges of tiny, translucent fins start to flutter, sending the creature gliding through the water like something from a fairy tale. A Southern California aquarium has...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2017, file photo, a sign on a door of the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington. Long-running research projects credited with pivotal discoveries about the harm that pesticides, air pollution and other hazards pose to children are in jeopardy or shutting down because the Environmental Protection Agency will not commit to their continued funding, researchers say. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
May 22, 2019 - 6:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-running research projects credited with pivotal discoveries about the harm that pesticides, air pollution and other hazards pose to children are in jeopardy or shutting down because the Environmental Protection Agency will not commit to their continued funding, researchers...
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FILE - In this April 19, 2019, file photo, Katrina Spade, the founder and CEO of Recompose, a company that hopes to use composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains, poses for a photo in a cemetery in Seattle, as she displays a sample of compost material left from the decomposition of a cow using a combination of wood chips, alfalfa and straw. On Tuesday, May 21, 2019, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill into law that allows licensed facilities to offer "natural organic reduction," which turns a body, mixed with substances such as wood chips and straw, into soil in a span of several weeks. Th law makes Washington the first state in the U.S. to approve composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 21, 2019 - 5:34 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Ashes to ashes, guts to dirt. Gov. Jay Inslee signed legislation Tuesday making Washington the first state to approve composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains. It allows licensed facilities to offer "natural organic reduction," which turns a body, mixed with...
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FILE - This Jan. 16, 2019 photo taken by a Utah Highway Patrol drone shows a big rig that has crashed into a resaturant in Wellington, Utah. In Utah, drones are hovering near avalanches to measure roaring snow. In North Carolina, they're combing the skies for the nests of endangered birds. In Kansas, meanwhile, they could soon be identifying sick cows through heat signatures. A survey released Monday, May 20, 2019 shows transportation agencies are using drones in nearly every U.S. state. (Utah Highway Patrol via AP, File)
May 20, 2019 - 3:23 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — In Utah, drones are hovering near avalanches to watch roaring snow. In North Carolina, they're searching for the nests of endangered birds. In Kansas, they could soon be identifying sick cows through heat signatures. Public transportation agencies are using drones in nearly...
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May 20, 2019 - 1:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday sided with a member of the Crow tribe who was fined for hunting elk in Wyoming's Bighorn National Forest, giving him a good chance to get a more than $8,000 fine against him overturned. The case the justices decided 5-4 is a win for Clayvin Herrera and...
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