Environment

FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 4, 2017 file photo, pyres of ivory are set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. According to a scientific report from the United Nations released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
March 13, 2019 - 7:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says. Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics,...
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Wells Fargo CEO Timothy Sloan is questioned by the House Financial Services Committee about revelations the bank had created millions of fake bank accounts to reach their financial goals, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 12, 2019 - 1:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEO of beleaguered Wells Fargo told Congress Tuesday that the bank has cleaned up its act after a series of scandals that affected millions of customers. But Democrats — and some Republicans — on the House Financial Services Committee didn't seem to be buying it. Wells Fargo...
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March 12, 2019 - 3:55 am
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German automaker Volkswagen said Tuesday it plans to ramp up its production of electric vehicles over the next ten years to 22 million and reduce its carbon footprint over vehicle life cycles by 30 percent. Previously, the company said it would aim for 15 million. That was...
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FILE - In this July 28, 2014, file photo, lightning strikes over Lake Mead near Hoover Dam that impounds Colorado River water at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. A major southern California utility is positioning itself to shoulder the state's entire water contributions under a plan to preserve a key Western river. The Metropolitan Water District is voting Tuesday, March 12, 2019 on a proposal to take on the Imperial Irrigation District's share of water that would be stored behind Lake Mead. Seven Western states having been working for years on the Colorado River drought plan. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
March 12, 2019 - 1:07 am
PHOENIX (AP) — A major Southern California water agency is positioning itself to shoulder the state's entire water contribution under a plan to preserve a key river in the U.S. West that serves 40 million people. The Metropolitan Water District board is voting Tuesday on a proposal to essentially...
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FILE - In this July 18, 2018, file photo, a wild horse jumps among others near Salt Lake City. The U.S. government is seeking new pastures for thousands of wild horses that have overpopulated Western ranges. Landowners interested in hosting large numbers of rounded-up wild horses on their property can now apply with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
March 09, 2019 - 2:25 pm
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — If you ever wished to gaze at a stomping, snorting, neighing panorama of Western heritage from your living-room window, now could be your chance. A classic image of the American West — wild horses stampeding across the landscape — not only has endured through the years but has...
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In this undated photo provided by Liran Samuni, chimpanzees in the Taï National Park in the Ivory Coast vocalize with another group nearby. A study released on Thursday, March 6, 2019 highlights the diversity of chimp behaviors within groups _ traditions that are at least in part learned socially, and transmitted from generation to generation. (Liran Samuni/Taï Chimpanzee Project via AP)
March 07, 2019 - 3:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Some chimpanzee groups are stone-throwers. Some use rocks to crack open tree nuts to eat. Others use sticks to fish for algae. As researchers learn more about Homo sapiens' closest living genetic relatives, they are also discovering more about the diversity of behaviors within...
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A masked man, center, believed to be former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn, center with blue cap, leaves Tokyo’s Detention Center in Tokyo, Wednesday, March 6, 2019. Ghosn was released Wednesday after putting up 1 billion yen ($8.9 million) in bail. (Yu Nakajima/Kyodo News via AP)
March 06, 2019 - 6:54 pm
Carlos Ghosn, the star auto executive credited with rescuing both Renault and Nissan, left a drab Tokyo detention center Wednesday after more than three months in custody, his identity obscured by a surgical mask, hat and construction worker's outfit. The jet-setting turnaround wizard was pursued...
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March 06, 2019 - 4:33 pm
DETROIT (AP) — New vehicles in the U.S. from the 2017 model year averaged slightly better gas mileage than the previous year, rising to a record 24.9 mpg, according to an annual report from the Environmental Protection Agency. But the mileage rose only 0.2 mpg, and environmental groups say it fell...
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FILE - In this June, 3, 2017, file photo, the sun sets behind Georgia Power's coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, in Juliette, Ga. As climate change becomes a hotter topic in American classrooms in 2019, some politicians are pushing back against the scientific consensus that global warming is real and man-made. (AP Photo/Branden Camp, File)
March 06, 2019 - 3:11 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut lawmaker wants to strike climate change from state science standards. A Virginia legislator worries teachers are indoctrinating students with their personal views on global warming. And an Oklahoma state senator wants educators to be able to introduce...
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Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Environment Maureen Sullivan at a House Oversight and Reform subcommittee hearing on PFAS chemicals and their risks on Wednesday, March 6, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
March 06, 2019 - 12:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon says it would cost $2 billion to clean up a toxic class of chemicals released at more than 400 bases. The estimate was detailed by Defense Department official Maureen Sullivan at a House Oversight subcommittee hearing Wednesday. The chemicals, called PFAS, are...
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