Environment

In this Dec. 19, 2014, photo, a worker digs in a fermentation bed at an organic pig farm in Handan in northern China's Hebei province. China, the world's largest producer of pork, is battling an African swine fever outbreak that could potentially devastate herds. Authorities say the disease, which is fatal only to pigs and wild boar, has been detected in multiple locations across the vast country. (Chinatopix via AP)
August 23, 2018 - 2:39 am
BEIJING (AP) — China has reported another outbreak of African swine fever that threatens the country's crucial pork industry, but officials say they have the situation under control. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said Thursday the latest cases were reported in the eastern city of...
Read More
Resident Engineer Steve Sherrill, with the US Army Corps of Engineers, talks about the project to raise some of the levees and seawalls in the area Thursday, July 26, 2018, in Port Arthur, Texas. As the nation plans new defenses against the more powerful storms and higher tides expected from climate change, one project stands out: an ambitious proposal to build a nearly 60-mile “spine” of concrete seawalls, earthen barriers, floating gates and steel levees on the Texas Gulf Coast.(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
August 22, 2018 - 10:19 am
PORT ARTHUR, Texas (AP) — As the nation plans new defenses against the more powerful storms and higher tides expected from climate change, one project stands out: an ambitious proposal to build a nearly 60-mile "spine" of concrete seawalls, earthen barriers, floating gates and steel levees on the...
Read More
August 21, 2018 - 10:36 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China, the world's largest producer of pork, is battling an African swine fever outbreak that could potentially devastate herds. Authorities say the disease, which only affects pigs and wild boar, has been detected in multiple locations across the vast country. It's unclear exactly...
Read More
In this July 27, 2018 photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. The Trump administration on Tuesday proposed a major rollback of Obama-era regulations on coal-fired power plants, striking at one of the former administration’s legacy programs to rein in climate-changing fossil-fuel emissions. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)
August 21, 2018 - 11:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved to dismantle another major piece of President Barack Obama's environmental legacy on Tuesday, proposing to dramatically scale back restrictions on climate-changing emissions from coal-fired power plants even as it acknowledged that could lead to more...
Read More
August 20, 2018 - 7:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's plan to roll back the centerpiece of Obama-era efforts to slow global warming(all times local): 8:20 p.m. The Trump administration is set to announce plans to roll back the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's efforts to slow global...
Read More
Jeanna Dietz hugs her daughter Eva, 7, while looking onto memorial on the front porch while others gather for a candle-lit vigil for Shanann Watts and her two daughters, Bella, 4, and Celeste, 3, in front of the Watts’ home on Friday, Aug. 17, 2018, in Frederick, Colo. Authorities are expected to file formal charges Monday against Christopher Watts, an oil and gas worker who authorities said dumped his wife and daughters' bodies on his employer's property. (Timothy Hurst/The Coloradoan via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 6:23 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Latest on the arrest of a Colorado man in the disappearance of his family (all times local): 5:20 p.m. A Colorado man told police that he killed his pregnant wife for strangling their daughters after he sought a separation. According to an arrest affidavit unsealed Monday,...
Read More
In this July 29, 2017 photo provided by KYUK-TV shows a gray whale that was killed in the Kuskokwim River is butchered and the meat and blubber distributed. Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, according to a federal investigative report. The report, released to The Associated Press through a public records, says that after the shooting began, the hunters then believed the whale to be a bowhead and that the harvest would be theirs as the first to shoot or harpoon it. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided not to prosecute the hunters. Instead it sent letters advising leaders in three villages about the limits to subsistence whaling. (Katie Basile/KYUK via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 6:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, a federal investigative report said. After the...
Read More
August 20, 2018 - 12:37 pm
DENVER (AP) — In a story Aug. 15 about the Colorado River, The Associated Press, relying on information from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, reported erroneously when potential cutbacks could begin if a shortage is declared. A shortage could be declared in the latter part of 2019, and cutbacks...
Read More
Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, left, and Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg address reporters at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, Monday, Aug. 20, 2018. Turnbull abandoned plans to legislate to limit greenhouse gas emissions to head off a revolt by conservative lawmakers. Turnbull conceded that he could not get legislation through the House of Representatives where his conservative coalition holds only a single-seat majority. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)
August 20, 2018 - 2:21 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's prime minister on Monday abandoned plans to legislate to limit greenhouse gas emissions to head off a revolt by conservative lawmakers. Malcolm Turnbull on Monday conceded that he could not get legislation through the House of Representatives where his...
Read More
FILE- In this April 23, 2018, file photo a car is filled with gasoline at a station in Windham, N.H. Conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S., the Trump administration declares in a major new policy statement that threatens to undermine decades of government campaigns for gas-thrifty cars and other conservation programs. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
August 19, 2018 - 11:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S., the Trump administration declares in a major new policy statement that threatens to undermine decades of government campaigns for gas-thrifty cars and other conservation programs. The position was outlined in a memo...
Read More

Pages