Environmental conservation and preservation

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, steam rises up on the surface of Lake Michigan at sunrise in Chicago. After repeated efforts to gut funding for a Great Lakes cleanup, President Donald Trump has done an about-face. The president announced during a rally Thursday, March 29, 2019, in Michigan, that he supports $300 million this year for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. Trump's change of heart came after he rode to the rally with several Republican congressmen from Michigan, who lobbied for the funding. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
March 29, 2019 - 8:44 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — President Donald Trump tried repeatedly to gut funding for a wide-ranging Great Lakes cleanup, only to be stymied by Congress. Suddenly, he did an about-face. It happened Thursday during a campaign-style speech in the battleground state of Michigan. For years, the...
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Oranges and tomatoes are seen on display for sale alongside a roll of plastic bags at a supermarket in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, Wednesday, March 27, 2019. Two New York lawmakers say Wednesday that they're optimistic that a ban on single-use plastic shopping bags could be included in the spending plan that's due Sunday. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 12:40 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Gov. Andrew Cuomo and fellow Democrats who control the Legislature have reached a deal to make New York the third state with a ban on single-use plastic grocery bags as they worked to finalize budget agreements, officials said Friday. The ban would prohibit grocery stores from...
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FILE - This March 17, 2019 file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force shows an aerial view of Offutt Air Force Base and surrounding areas in Nebraska affected by flood waters. After this spring's massive flooding along the Missouri River, many want to blame the agency that manages the river's dams for making the disaster worse, but it may not be that simple. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says much of the water that created this month's flooding came from rain and melting snow that flowed into the river downstream of all the dams, and at the same time, massive amounts of water filled the reservoirs and some had to be released. (Tech. Sgt. Rachelle Blake/U.S. Air Force via AP, File)
March 28, 2019 - 7:36 pm
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — After this spring's massive flooding along the Missouri River, many want to blame the agency that manages the river's dams for making the disaster worse, but it may not be that simple. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says much of the water that created the flooding came from...
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In this Tuesday, March 12, 2019 photo, a loggerhead turtle swims in a tank at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Warmer waters in New England are proving attractive to sea turtles, but with a catch. Many are swimming north only to be trapped by cooling waters. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
March 28, 2019 - 12:14 am
QUINCY, Mass. (AP) — At a sea turtle hospital housed at an old New England shipyard, a biologist leans over a table and uses a needle to draw blood from a sick loggerhead before tagging its flailing flipper. These were the first tentative steps toward a return to the ocean for this juvenile...
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March 26, 2019 - 3:28 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California crab fisheries will close for the season in April when whales are feeding off the state's coast as part of an effort to keep Dungeness crab fishery gear from killing protected whales, officials announced Tuesday. The April 15 closure, three months before the fishing...
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The Supreme Court building is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2019. The Supreme Court is returning to arguments over whether the political task of redistricting can be overly partisan. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 26, 2019 - 2:27 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The National Park Service improperly banned an Alaska moose hunter from using a hovercraft on a river through a national preserve, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a unanimous decision. The court limited the National Park Service's authority to enforce laws and...
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FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump talks with California Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom, left, as California Gov. Jerry Brown, walks at right during a visit to a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp wildfire in Paradise, Calif. Newsom is declaring a state of emergency to speed up forest management ahead of the next wildfire season and will sign an order Friday, March 22, 2019, allowing fire officials to bypass certain environmental and other regulations in order to clear dead trees and vegetation more quickly. It will apply to 35 projects across 90,000 acres of land. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
March 22, 2019 - 4:08 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom moved Friday to bypass environmental regulations to prepare for the next wildfire season, a move he said was necessary to prevent further loss of life even as it frustrated activists in a state viewed as a national environmental leader. "The...
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FILE - This March 12, 2010 file photo shows deer seeking foliage in retreating snow in grasslands near Miles City, Mont. This area is typical of other grasslands and similar tracts that are included in a policy by acting U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, who is ordering federal land managers to give more consideration to public access concerns when selling or trading public land. The executive Thursday, March 21, 2019 order comes amid longstanding complaints that millions of acres of state and federal land in the American West can be reached only through private property or small slivers of public land. (Steve Allison/Miles City Star via AP, File)
March 21, 2019 - 7:04 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Acting U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt ordered federal land managers on Thursday to give greater priority to access for hunting, fishing and other kinds of recreation when the government considers selling or trading public land. The secretarial order comes amid...
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FILE - In this July 28, 2014, file photo, lightning strikes over Lake Mead near Hoover Dam that impounds Colorado River water at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Several states that rely on a major Western river are pushing for federal legislation to implement a plan to keep key reservoirs from shrinking amid a prolonged drought. The Colorado River serves 40 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. Representatives from those states are meeting Tuesday, March 19, 2019, to sign a letter to Congress asking for support for so-called drought contingency plans. AP Photo/John Locher, File)
March 19, 2019 - 7:56 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Seven states that rely on a major waterway in the U.S. West have finished a yearslong effort to create a plan to protect the Colorado River amid a prolonged drought, the federal government declared Tuesday. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman commended...
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FILE – In this July 12, 2011, file photo, two rowers paddle along the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
March 19, 2019 - 8:20 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in an Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River in northeast Ohio was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike...
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