Environmental conservation and preservation

F-22s taxi down the runway as they prepare to depart Langley Air Force Base, Va., Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2018, as Hurricane Florence approaches the Eastern Seaboard. Officials from Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Hampton said the base's F-22 Raptors and T-38 Talon training jets, as a precaution, were headed for Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base in central Ohio. (Jonathon Gruenke/The Daily Press via AP)
September 12, 2018 - 12:24 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Navy is moving people and ships ahead of Hurricane Florence , and the Air Force and Army are flying advanced aircraft elsewhere as a safeguard. Some remaining Marines, meanwhile, are digging in their heels. Florence is headed for a region with some of the most well-known...
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Gov. Jerry Brown, signs a copy of the environmental measure SB100 as the bill's author, state Sen. Kevin de Leon, right, holds a copy of the bill, Monday, Sept. 10, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. SB100 sets a goal of phasing out all fossil fuels from the state's electricity sector by 2045. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
September 10, 2018 - 7:00 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California has set a goal of phasing out electricity produced by fossil fuels by 2045 under legislation signed Monday by Gov. Jerry Brown, who said the policy should serve as a model for other states and nations. Brown, who has positioned California as a global leader in...
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In this Jan. 2007, photo, a Thai customs official displays a seized Indian star tortoise during a press conference in Bangkok, Thailand. TRAFFIC, a wildlife monitoring group, says research it has conducted since 2016 has found that people are increasingly buying and selling endangered animals on Facebook groups in Thailand. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
September 10, 2018 - 8:35 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A wildlife monitoring group says research it has conducted since 2016 has found a sharp increase in the number of people belonging to Facebook groups in Thailand where endangered animals are bought and sold. The monitoring network TRAFFIC said its researchers found 1,521 animals for...
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FILE - In this May 21, 2015, file photo, an oil-covered bird flaps its wings amid at Refugio State Beach, north of Goleta, Calif. A California jury has found a pipeline company guilty of nine criminal charges for causing a 2015 oil spill that was the state's worst coastal spill in 25 years. The jury reached its verdict against Plains All American Pipeline of Houston on Friday, Sept. 7, 2018, following a four-month trial. The jury found Plains guilty of a felony count of failing to properly maintain its pipeline and eight misdemeanor charges, including killing marine mammals and protected sea birds. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
September 07, 2018 - 8:57 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A pipeline company was convicted of nine criminal charges Friday for causing the worst California coastal spill in 25 years, a disaster that blackened popular beaches for miles, killed wildlife and hurt tourism and fishing. A Santa Barbara County jury found Houston-based Plains...
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FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file photo elephants drink water in the Chobe National Park in Botswana. A conservation group says elephant poaching has increased in Botswana, which has long been viewed as a rare refuge for elephants in Africa. (AP Photo/Charmaine Noronha, File)
September 04, 2018 - 2:37 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Botswana, long viewed as a rare refuge for African elephants, is coming under increasing threat from poachers. Poachers are killing elephants in the southern African country in growing numbers after wiping out large numbers of elephants in nearby Zambia and Angola, a...
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File - In this Aug. 9, 2018, file photo, firefighters keep watch the Holy Fire burning in the Cleveland National Forest in Lake Elsinore, Calif. Researchers have expanded a health-monitoring study of wildland firefighters after a previous study found season-long health declines and deteriorating reaction times. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
September 02, 2018 - 5:50 am
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Randy Brooks' son had a request three years ago: What could his dad do to make wildland firefighting safer? To Brooks, a professor at the University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources who deals with wildland firefighting, it was more of a command. His son, Bo Brooks, is a...
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August 31, 2018 - 12:40 pm
BRAINTREE, Mass. (AP) — Police responding to a Massachusetts go-kart track found a venomous snake wrapped around a tree in the parking lot. Braintree police say the timber rattlesnake was discovered Wednesday night near X1 Boston. Experts think the rattlesnake likely came from the nearby 6,000-acre...
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FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2013, file photo, a grizzly bear cub searches for fallen fruit beneath an apple tree a few miles from the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Gardiner, Mont. A judge will decide whether the Lower 48 states' first grizzly bear hunting season in more than four decades will open as scheduled the weekend of Aug. 31, 2018. (Alan Rogers/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP, file)
August 31, 2018 - 11:58 am
MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — Wildlife officials in Wyoming and Idaho say they've been contacting hunters licensed to kill grizzly bears to tell them their hunts are on hold following a judge's ruling. The two states on Saturday had been scheduled to hold their first grizzly hunts in more than 40 years in...
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August 30, 2018 - 1:35 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — At least eight people were injured Thursday when an explosion caused a section of roof to collapse at a Chicago water reclamation plant, trapping some of the injured people inside, authorities said. Chicago Fire Department spokesman Larry Merritt told the Chicago Tribune that eight...
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In this July 29, 2017 photo provided by KYUK-TV shows a gray whale that was killed in the Kuskokwim River is butchered and the meat and blubber distributed. Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, according to a federal investigative report. The report, released to The Associated Press through a public records, says that after the shooting began, the hunters then believed the whale to be a bowhead and that the harvest would be theirs as the first to shoot or harpoon it. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided not to prosecute the hunters. Instead it sent letters advising leaders in three villages about the limits to subsistence whaling. (Katie Basile/KYUK via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 6:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, a federal investigative report said. After the...
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