Environmental science

In this Nov. 27, 2019, photo, Georgia Tech professor Kim Cobb poses for a photo at her home in Atlanta. Some climate scientists and activists, including Cobb, are limiting their flying, their consumption of meat and their overall carbon footprints to avoid adding to the global warming they study. (AP Photo/John Amis)
December 08, 2019 - 6:50 am
For years, Kim Cobb was the Indiana Jones of climate science. The Georgia Tech professor flew to the caves of Borneo to study ancient and current climate conditions. She jetted to a remote South Pacific island to see the effects of warming on coral. Add to that flights to Paris, Rome, Vancouver and...
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A new study finds that past computer simulations of climate change have been pretty accurate.;
December 04, 2019 - 11:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The computer models used to simulate what heat-trapping gases will do to global temperatures have been pretty spot-on in their predictions, a new study found. After years of hearing critics blast the models' accuracy, climate scientist Zeke Hausfather decided to see just how good...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, apparently confirming fears about the invaders' threat to native species, according to a newly released study. Analysis of more than 20 years of population data suggests the carp are out-competing fish prized by anglers, such as yellow perch, bluegill, and black and white crappie, the report said. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
KNSS News
November 16, 2019 - 10:16 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A new study says sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp. The study’s lead author says it’s among the first to establish a solid link between the presence of invasive carp and a drop-off of native species...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
October 29, 2019 - 11:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Chris Lene sweeps water out of one of the businesses in the building he owns that was flooded by rainwater in Sacramento, Calif. Climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet, according a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
October 21, 2019 - 2:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet. Scientists looked at 33 El Ninos since 1901. This natural weather phenomenon is the warming of equatorial Pacific that triggers weather extremes...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 4:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down power...
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October 01, 2019 - 11:53 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish prosecutors on Tuesday pressed animal cruelty charges against the owner of a herd of goats, some of whom died on an island in Warsaw. Some 60 goats and sheep from a private farm had been sent to an island on the Vistula River last year to help control its lush grass and...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, a doctor performs an ultrasound scan on a pregnant woman at a hospital in Chicago. A new study released Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. During pregnancy, particle pollution is linked to premature births and low birth weight, but scientists don’t understand why. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford, File)
September 17, 2019 - 10:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. Pollution composed of tiny particles from car exhaust, factory smokestacks and other sources is dangerous to everyone's health, and during...
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Valentino Ingraham washes clothing to remove salt and dirt amid the rubble of his mother's property destroyed by Hurricane Dorian in Rocky Creek East End, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Sunday, Sept. 8, 2019. The motors of his family's boats were also destroyed. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
September 10, 2019 - 4:43 am
BERLIN (AP) — A group of leaders from business, politics and science have called for a massive investment in adapting to climate change over the next decade, arguing it would reap significant returns as countries avoid catastrophic losses and boost their economies. The Global Commission on...
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U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds, R-SD, chairman of the Senate subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Regulatory Oversight, listens as Bill Beacom of Sioux City, Iowa, a retired Missouri River ship captain, makes a point after Rounds held a hearing on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' management of 2019 Missouri River Basin flooding Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019, in North Sioux City, South Dakota. (Tim Hynds/Sioux City Journal via AP)
August 28, 2019 - 8:27 pm
NORTH SIOUX CITY, S.D. (AP) — An official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Wednesday a study is needed to consider changes to flood-control measures along the Missouri River south of Sioux City, Iowa. Speaking after a U.S. Senate field hearing in North Sioux City, South Dakota, Brig. Gen...
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