fish

This Sept. 14, 2020 photo shows shows a Duke Energy natural gas-fired electric power plant on Sutton Lake in Wilmington, N.C. It went online in 2013 and replaced a coal-fired plant that had polluted the lake with coal ash. Sutton Lake is among a number of man-made reservoirs in the U.S. that environmentalists say will lose federal protection from pollution under a Trump administration revision of the Clean Water Act that took effect this year. (AP Photo/John Flesher)
September 27, 2020 - 8:33 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Nearly 50 years ago, a power company received permission from North Carolina to build a reservoir by damming a creek near the coastal city of Wilmington. It would provide a source of steam to generate electricity and a place to cool hot water from an adjacent coal-fired...
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In this Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020 photo released by Kensington Palace, Britain's Prince William, centre, and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, react with Naturalist David Attenborough, left, with their children, Prince George, seated, Princess Charlotte, right and Prince Louis, foreground, in the gardens of Kensington Palace in London after Prince William joined Attenborough to watch a private outdoor screening of his upcoming film - David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet. (Kensington Palace via AP)
September 27, 2020 - 5:08 am
LONDON (AP) — Veteran broadcaster and naturalist David Attenborough has given Britain’s Prince George a giant shark tooth fossil after a private viewing of his new documentary at Kensington Palace. Photos released by the palace showed the 7-year-old prince looking intrigued as he looked at the...
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September 23, 2020 - 8:24 am
MARATHON, Fla. (AP) — When a shark attacked her husband during a snorkeling trip in the Florida Keys, his pregnant wife didn't think twice, jumping out of a boat to pull him to safety, a sheriff's deputy said. Andrew Eddy, 30, was on a private boat with his wife, Margot Dukes-Eddy and her family at...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2018, file photo, a black bear saunters across a busy street in downtown Juneau, Alaska. A larger than normal number of young bears and dwindling natural food supply for them are forcing the animals to head for Juneau's garbage with unusual frequency, a wildlife official said. KTOO Public Media reports that a poor berry crop and lackluster salmon runs mean more bears are looking for food among the city's trash. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer, File)
September 21, 2020 - 9:51 am
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A larger than normal number of young bears and dwindling natural food supply for them are forcing the animals to head for Juneau's garbage with unusual frequency, a wildlife official said. A poor berry crop and lackluster salmon runs this year mean more bears are looking for...
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Surfers wade in the water waiting for waves off the Southern Gold Coast area of Greenmount Beach, Gold Coast, Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. A shark fatally mauled a man on Tuesday on Australia’s Gold Coast city tourist strip, an official said. (David Clark/AAP via AP)
September 08, 2020 - 11:13 pm
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Authorities will investigate whether a dead tiger shark caught in a net off an Australian beach killed a surfer, an official said Wednesday. Nick Slater, 46, was fatally mauled on Tuesday off popular Greenmount Beach on the Gold Coast tourist strip in a rare attack off a...
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Lionfish, lured by a sheet of plastic lattice, swim near a trap offshore near Destin, Fla., on July 6, 2018. Scientists are looking at traps as a better way to kill the beautiful but brutally destructive invaders with huge appetites than shooting them one by one with spearguns. Traps could also be used at depths spearfishers cannot reach. (Alexander Fogg/Destin – Fort Walton Beach via AP)
August 26, 2020 - 1:21 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The quest is on for a better way to kill beautiful but brutally destructive lionfish than shooting them one by one with spearguns. The voracious invaders with huge appetites, flashy stripes and a mane of venomous spines are a problem in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico and the...
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FILE - In this July 13, 2007, file photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. A proposed gold and copper mine at the headwaters of the world's largest sockeye salmon fishery in Alaska would cause "unavoidable adverse impacts," the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in a letter to the developer released Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. The corps is asking the backers of Pebble Mine to come up with a mitigation plan within 90 days for nearly 3,000 acres of land and nearly 200 miles of streams it says could be affected if the controversial mine moves forward. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
August 24, 2020 - 1:50 pm
ANCHORAGE, ALASKA (AP) — A proposed gold and copper mine at the headwaters of the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery in Alaska would cause “unavoidable adverse impacts,” the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in a letter to the developer released Monday. The corps is giving Pebble Limited...
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August 22, 2020 - 6:52 pm
The Trump administration plans to block a proposed copper and gold mine near the headwaters of a major U.S. salmon fishery in Alaska, six people described as familiar with its plans told Politico on Saturday. The administration's rejection of the Pebble Mine project is expected to come after Trump...
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Edward Murat, 20, carries his inner tube to the beach for a day of open sea fishing at Playa Escondida in La Guaira, Venezuela, Friday, Aug. 14, 2020. Survival during the new coronavirus pandemic has forced a small but growing number of people in the coastal town to turn to fishing the high sea on salvaged inner tubes. (AP Photo/Matias Delacroix)
August 15, 2020 - 7:34 pm
LA GUAIRA, Venezuela (AP) — The biggest fear is a fishhook puncturing the inner tube that keeps them afloat far from shore. Then come sharks grabbing their catch and maybe biting their legs. And the current that threatens to pull them out to sea. A small but growing number of people in the coastal...
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FILE - In this April 24, 2008, file photo, a sea lion eats a salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam in North Bonneville, Wash. Federal authorities on Friday, Aug. 14, 2020, granted permission for Washington state, Oregon and several Native American tribes to begin killing hundreds of salmon-hungry sea lions in the Columbia River and its tributaries over the next five years. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
August 14, 2020 - 4:05 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — U.S. authorities on Friday gave wildlife managers in Washington, Oregon and Idaho permission to start killing hundreds of sea lions in the Columbia River basin in hopes of helping struggling salmon and steelhead trout. The bulky marine mammals long ago figured out that they could...
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