Freedom of the press

January 18, 2021 - 8:55 am
ISTANBUL (AP) — Facebook has started the process of assigning a legal representative in Turkey to comply with a law governing social media companies, Turkey’s official Anadolu news agency said Monday. The law, which passed in July, requires social media companies such as Facebook and Twitter to...
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FILE - This combination of photos shows logos for social media platforms Facebook and Twitter. For the past four years, President Donald Trump has enjoyed special status not given to regular users on Twitter and Facebook even as he used his perch atop the social media pyramid to peddle misinformation and hurl abuse at his critics. Could his loose leash on the platforms come to an end on Jan. 20, 2021, when his successor is inaugurated? (AP Photo/File)
January 12, 2021 - 3:47 pm
As the world adjusts to a Twitter without @realdonaldtrump, the next big question is: “Now what?" Major tech platforms, long accused of giving President Donald Trump special treatment not allotted to regular users, have shown him the door in the wake of his incitement of violence by supporters at...
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The logo of the social media platform Parler is displayed in Berlin, Jan. 10, 2021. In the background on a screen is the platform's website. The conservative-friendly social network Parler was booted off the internet Monday, Jan. 11, over ties to last week's siege on the U.S. Capitol, but not before hackers made off with an archive of its posts, including any that might have helped organize or document the riot. (Christophe Gateau/dpa via AP)
January 11, 2021 - 7:20 pm
The conservative-friendly social network Parler was booted off the internet Monday over ties to last week’s siege on the U.S. Capitol, but not before digital activists made off with an archive of its posts, including any that might have helped organize or document the riot. Amazon kicked Parler off...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 file photo, Pastor Paula White leads a prayer in Washington, at a rally in support of President Donald Trump called the "Save America Rally." On Sunday, Jan. 10, the first day of Christian worship services since the Capitol riot, religious leaders who have supported the president in the past delivered messages ranging from no mention of the events of that day to incendiary recitations of debunked conspiracy theories. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
January 10, 2021 - 3:53 pm
Support for President Donald Trump has been consistently strong among evangelicals, with some professing that he has been the best friend Christians have had in the White House. On the first Sunday since a mob of his supporters seeking to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's election stormed the U...
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This Friday, Jan. 8, 2021 image shows the suspended Twitter account of President Donald Trump. On Friday, the social media company permanently suspended Trump from its platform, citing "risk of further incitement of violence." (AP Photo/Tali Arbel)
January 10, 2021 - 3:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Social media companies decided this past week they had finally seen enough from President Donald Trump. Facebook and Instagram suspended Trump at least until Inauguration Day. Twitch and Snapchat also disabled Trump’s accounts. To top it all off, Twitter ended a nearly 12-year run...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 18, 2020 file photo, President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable with governors on the reopening of America's small businesses, in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. Though stripped of his Twitter account for inciting rebellion, President Donald Trump does have alternative options of much smaller reach. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
January 10, 2021 - 1:43 pm
BOSTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has been kicked off of most mainstream social media platforms following his supporters’ siege on the U.S. Capitol. But it remains to be seen how fast or where — if anywhere — on the internet he will be able to reach his followers. The far right-friendly Parler...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 18, 2020 file photo, President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable with governors on the reopening of America's small businesses, in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. Though stripped of his Twitter account for inciting rebellion, President Donald Trump does have alternative options of much smaller reach. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
January 09, 2021 - 4:38 pm
BOSTON (AP) — One Twitter wag joked about lights flickering on and off at the White House being Donald Trump signaling to his followers in Morse code after Twitter and Facebook squelched the president for inciting rebellion. Though deprived of his big online megaphones, Trump does have alternative...
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This Friday, Jan. 8, 2021 image shows the suspended Twitter account of President Donald Trump. On Friday, the social media company permanently suspended Trump from its platform, citing "risk of further incitement of violence." (AP Photo/Tali Arbel)
January 08, 2021 - 9:58 pm
Twitter banned President Donald Trump's account Friday, citing “the risk of further incitement of violence" following the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Twitter has long given Trump and other world leaders broad exemptions from its rules against personal attacks, hate speech...
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Trump supporters gather outside the Capitol, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
January 08, 2021 - 7:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A printing company in Maryland saw the photo on Twitter Wednesday night: an employee roaming the halls of the U.S. Capitol with a company badge around his neck. He was fired the next day. Others are facing similar repercussions at work for their participation in Wednesday's riot at...
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This is a court artist sketch by Elizabeth Cook of Julian Assange appearing at the Old Bailey in London for the ruling in his extradition case, in London, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021. A British judge has rejected the United States’ request to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to face espionage charges, saying it would be “oppressive” because of his mental health. District Judge Vanessa Baraitser said Assange was likely to kill himself if sent to the U.S. The U.S. government said it would appeal the decision. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
January 04, 2021 - 6:55 pm
LONDON (AP) — A British judge on Monday rejected the United States’ request to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to face espionage charges over the publication of secret U.S. documents a decade ago, saying he was likely to kill himself if held under harsh U.S. prison conditions. In a mixed...
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