Genetics

In this Feb. 12, 2019 photo, Meghan Waldron walks down the street in Boston. Waldron is a student at Emerson College with progeria, one of the world's rarest diseases. The first treatment has been approved for progeria, Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved Zokinvy which was shown in testing to extend patients’ lives by 2 ½ years on average. (Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via AP)
November 20, 2020 - 6:06 pm
The first drug was approved Friday for a rare genetic disorder that stunts growth and causes rapid aging in children, after studies showed it can extend their lives. Kids with the genetic disorder progeria typically die in their early teens, usually from heart disease. But in testing, children...
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FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2020 file photo, minks that have been culled, at a farm in Farre in the southern part of Jutland, Denmark. Denmark’s prime minister says the government wants to cull all 15 million minks in Danish farms, to minimize the risk of them re-transmitting the new coronavirus to humans. She said Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, a report from a government agency that maps the coronavirus in Denmark has shown a mutation in the virus found in 12 people in the northern part of the country who got infected by minks. (Mette Moerk/Ritzau Scanpix via AP, File)
November 06, 2020 - 6:36 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — More than a quarter million Danes went into lockdown Friday in a northern region of the country where a mutated variation of the coronavirus has infected minks being farmed for their fur, leading to an order to kill millions of the animals. Prime Minister Mette...
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November 04, 2020 - 10:17 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Denmark's prime minister said Wednesday that the government wants to cull all minks in Danish farms, to minimize the risk of them re-transmitting the new coronavirus to humans. Mette Frederiksen said a report from a government agency that maps the coronavirus in Denmark...
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This Sept. 1, 2020 photo provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows Kurt, a tiny horse who is actually a clone. Little Kurt looks like any other baby horse as he frolics playfully in his pen. But the 2-month-old, dun-colored colt was created by fusing cells taken from an endangered Przewalski's horse at the San Diego Zoo in 1980. The cells were infused with an egg from a domestic horse that gave birth to Kurt two months ago. The baby boy was named for Kurt Benirschke, a founder of the San Diego Zoo's Frozen Zoo, where thousands of cell cultures are stored. Scientists hope he'll help restore the Przewalski's population, which numbers only about 2,000. (Christine Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global via AP)
October 14, 2020 - 6:59 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Little Kurt looks like any other baby horse as he frolics playfully in his pen. He isn't afraid to kick or head-butt an intruder who gets in his way and, when he's hungry, dashes over to his mother for milk. But 2-month-old Kurt differs from every other baby horse of his kind in...
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, left, and the French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, right, poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ‘molecular scissors’ that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
KNSS News
October 08, 2020 - 3:29 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Nobel Prize in chemistry went to two researchers Wednesday for a gene-editing tool that has revolutionized science by providing a way to alter DNA, the code of life — technology already being used to try to cure a host of diseases and raise better crops and livestock...
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September 30, 2020 - 7:20 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say genes that some people have inherited from their Neanderthal ancestors may increase the likelihood of suffering severe forms of COVID-19. A study by European scientists published Wednesday by the journal Nature identifies a cluster of genes that are linked to a higher...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018 file photo, genetic researcher He Jiankui arrives for the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong. A new report from an international commission of scientists sets criteria for when altering genes in human embryos might be considered, two years after He shocked the world by claiming to have made the first "CRISPR babies." (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
September 03, 2020 - 9:12 am
It’s still too soon to try to make genetically edited babies because the science isn’t advanced enough to ensure safety, says an international panel of experts who also mapped a pathway for any countries that want to consider it. Thursday’s report comes nearly two years after a Chinese scientist...
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FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito known to carry the Zika virus, is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Sometime next year, genetically modified mosquitoes will be released in the Florida Keys in an effort to combat persistent insect-borne diseases such as Dengue fever and the Zika virus. The plan approved Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020, by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District calls for a pilot project in 2021 involving the striped-legged Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is not native to Florida. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
August 20, 2020 - 12:42 pm
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Sometime next year, genetically modified mosquitoes will be released in the Florida Keys in an effort to combat persistent insect-borne diseases such as Dengue fever and the Zika virus. The plan approved this week by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District calls for a...
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FILE - In this Nov. 3, 2017, file photo, residents line up at a security checkpoint into the Hotan Bazaar where a screen shows Chinese President Xi Jinping in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. The U.S. government has imposed trade sanctions on 11 companies it says are implicated in human rights abuses in China’s Muslim northwestern region of Xinjiang.(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
July 21, 2020 - 9:51 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China said Tuesday it would take unspecified “necessary measures" after the U.S. government imposed trade sanctions on 11 companies it says are implicated in human rights abuses in China’s Muslim northwestern region of Xinjiang. The sanctions add to U.S. pressure on Beijing over...
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FILE - In this June 12, 2020, file photo, a health worker draws blood for COVID-19 antibody testing in Dearborn, Mich. A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients published Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests a person's blood type may have some influence on whether they develop severe disease. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
June 17, 2020 - 7:01 pm
A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were...
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