Genetics

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 15, 2015 file photo, a lesbian couple holds hands in Salt Lake City. Released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, the largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, echoing research that says there is no single “gay gene.” (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
August 29, 2019 - 1:41 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 11:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:28 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 21, 2019 - 12:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, an embryo receives a small dose of Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a microscope in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province, during work by scientist He Jiankui's team. A report released on Monday, June 3, 2019, shows that people with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection have heightened overall death rate, warning that genetic tinkering can produce risks. Rasmus Nielsen of the University of California, Berkeley, senior author of the paper, acknowledged that his result cannot be applied directly to the two girls in China. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
June 03, 2019 - 10:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — People with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection may die sooner, according to a study that suggests tinkering with a gene to try to fix one problem may cause others. The study authors cited the case of the Chinese researcher who tried to produce this mutation in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2002, file photo, Sydney Brenner, a professor in the Molecular Sciences Institute in Berkeley, Calif., gestures during a press conference in Munich, Germany. Brenner, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist who helped decipher the genetic code and whose research on a roundworm laid the groundwork for decades of human disease research, has died. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California said Brenner died Friday, April 5, 2019 in Singapore. He was 92. (AP Photo/Jan Pitman, File)
April 06, 2019 - 5:01 pm
LA JOLLA, Calif. (AP) — Sydney Brenner, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist who helped decipher the genetic code and whose research on a roundworm sparked a new field of human disease research, has died. He was 92. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California, where Brenner spent part of his...
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FILE - This Monday, July 10, 2017 file photo shows different shaped glasses of wine in Sonoma, Calif. According to a large genetic study released on Thursday, April 4, 2019, drinking alcohol raises the risk of high blood pressure and stroke, debunking previous claims that moderate drinking was protective. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
April 04, 2019 - 5:56 pm
LONDON (AP) — It might just be enough to kill your buzz: A new study challenges the idea that a drink or two a day could actually be good for you. In a study conducted in China, the researchers found that moderate drinking slightly raised the risk of stroke and high blood pressure. They weren't...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 10:25 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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This March 2019 image shows part of the health advice option in a 23andme genetic test. But Isaac Kohane, a biomedical researcher at Harvard, said research in the field is still limited and that there’s little evidence any small effects from genetic variations can be translated into meaningful dietary advice. (AP Photo)
March 25, 2019 - 8:30 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Avoid fast food, eat vegetables and exercise. It sounds like generic health advice, but they're tips supposedly tailored to my DNA profile. The suggestions come from 23andme, one of the companies offering to point you toward the optimal eating and exercise habits for your genetics...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, a researcher installs a fine glass pipette into a microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization is calling for the U.N. health agency to create a global registry of scientists working on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
March 19, 2019 - 1:52 pm
GENEVA (AP) — A panel convened by the World Health Organization said it would be "irresponsible" for scientists to use gene editing for reproductive purposes, but stopped short of calling for a ban. The experts also called for the U.N. health agency to create a database of scientists working on...
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