Genetics

September 04, 2018 - 12:34 pm
LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Researchers in the United States and Britain are sharing a 1 million-euro ($1.16 million) prize from a Portuguese scientific foundation for developing revolutionary gene therapy that has restored the sight of children. The Lisbon, Portugal-based Champalimaud Foundation's...
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In this 2011 photo provided by Bence Viola of the University of Toronto, researchers excavate a cave for Denisovan fossils in the Altai Krai area of Russia. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, scientists reported in the journal Nature that they have found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. (Bence Viola/Department of Anthropology - University of Toronto/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 12:05 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 file photo, a nurse practitioner prepares to start the first human gene editing treatment for Hunter syndrome, an inherited metabolic disease, at a hospital in Oakland, Calif. On Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, federal officials said that gene therapy is becoming an established form of medical care and carries no special risks that warrant special regulation, as they revised rules for vetting such experiments and products. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 15, 2018 - 5:55 pm
U.S. health officials are eliminating special regulations for gene therapy experiments, saying that what was once exotic science is quickly becoming an established form of medical care with no extraordinary risks. A special National Institutes of Health oversight panel will no longer review all...
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August 13, 2018 - 1:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — You know your cholesterol, your blood pressure ... your heart gene score? Researchers say a new way of analyzing genetic test data may one day help identify people at high risk of a youthful heart attack in time to help. Today, gene testing mostly focuses on rare mutations in one...
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