Government programs

FILE - In this March 7, 2019, photo visitors to the Pittsburgh veterans job fair meet with recruiters at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh. Veterans and active service members can get help starting or running a business from programs sponsored by the federal government and private groups. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
November 11, 2019 - 1:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — For many people who leave military service, the next logical step is becoming an entrepreneur. There are federal, state and private sector resources for veterans to help them learn about operating a business, and, when their companies are up and running, get financing help,...
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Michelle Lainez, 17, originally from El Salvador but now living in Gaithersburg, Md., speaks during a rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, Nov. 8, 2019. The Supreme Court on Tuesday takes up the Trump administration’s plan to end legal protections that shield nearly 700,000 immigrants from deportation, in a case with strong political overtones amid the 2020 presidential election campaign. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
November 10, 2019 - 8:11 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up the Trump administration's plan to end legal protections that shield 660,000 immigrants from deportation, a case with strong political overtones amid the 2020 presidential election campaign. All eyes will be on Chief Justice John Roberts when the...
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Joseph Diaz, 10, right, and his brother, John Diaz, 7, watch videos as their parents, Karina Ruiz and Humberto Diaz prepare dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA.(AP Photo/Matt York)
November 09, 2019 - 12:18 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Karina Ruiz's life is deeply rooted in Phoenix. She has three children and two grandkids, a side gig selling houses, frantic days rushing kids off to school and activities, a busy work schedule filled with meetings. The 35-year-old knows that little of this would be possible without...
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November 09, 2019 - 7:15 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story Nov. 6 about elections in Virginia and Kentucky, The Associated Press reported erroneously that more than twice as many people in Virginia voted in state legislative races than 2015. The number of ballots case Tuesday increased by more than 50% compared with four years...
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Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a fund-raising fish fry for U.S. Rep. Abby Finkenauer, D-Iowa, Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019, at Hawkeye Downs Expo Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
November 05, 2019 - 6:35 pm
Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is ramping up his feud with rival Elizabeth Warren in a new post that attacks her as having an "angry unyielding viewpoint" on health care. Tuesday's post on Medium comes in response to Warren's swipe last week that Biden is "running in the wrong...
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FILE - In this May 29, 2019, file photo, Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks to reporters in his office at the state Capitol in Juneau, Alaska. A fight is brewing over whether Dunleavy, a Republican who took office in Dec. 2018, should be recalled. Critics say he’s incompetent and has recklessly tried to cut spending while supporters see a politically motivated attempt to undo the last election. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer, File)
November 04, 2019 - 6:55 pm
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Supporters of an effort to recall Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy are vowing to take their fight to court after an election official on Monday rejected their bid to move forward with seeking to oust him from office. Division of Elections Director Gail Fenumiai said she based her...
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FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2018, file photo, the U.S. Medicare Handbook is photographed, in Washington. A new study finds that more than half of seriously ill Medicare enrollees _ 53% _ struggle to pay their medical bills. Prescription drugs are the leading problem. The researchers who wrote Monday’s report in the journal Health Affairs were surprised by their findings, since Medicare is considered relatively good coverage. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
November 04, 2019 - 3:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than half of seriously ill Medicare enrollees face financial hardships with medical bills, with prescription drug costs the leading problem, according to a study published Monday. The study in the journal Health Affairs comes as legislation to curb drug costs for seniors...
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November 01, 2019 - 10:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump administration officials say they're working to resolve problems with HealthCare.gov following reports of widespread technical glitches on the first day of "Obamacare" sign-ups. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in a statement Friday that it's aware that...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren greets supporters before the Iowa Democratic Party's Liberty and Justice Celebration, Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
November 01, 2019 - 4:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Elizabeth Warren on Friday proposed $20 trillion in federal spending over the next decade to provide health care to every American without raising taxes on the middle class, a politically risky effort that pits the goal of universal coverage against skepticism of government-run...
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In this handout photo provided by Mexico's Presidential Press Office, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador watches a video that shows the capture of Ovidio Guzman Lopez, a son of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, who was then released, during the daily press conference at the National Palace in Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019. Lopez Obrador said on Thursday that his government will not be forced into a drug war, adding that his strategy is something else. “Nothing has hurt Mexico more than the dishonesty of the governing,” Mexico’s president said, implying that corruption is to blame for the country’s insecurity, violence and drug trafficking. (Mexico's Presidential Press Office via AP)
November 01, 2019 - 12:13 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — A sloppy operation that failed to nab Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán's son - followed by days of changing explanations - has revealed that Mexico's government has no clear security strategy, experts say. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his security Cabinet have defined their...
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