Government taxation and revenue

Retired coal miner John Robinson uses a nebulizer during his daily breathing treatments for black lung disease on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019 in Coeburn, Va. Robinson was 47 when he was diagnosed with black lung disease, part of a new generation of black lung sufferers who are contracting the deadly disease at younger ages. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan)
March 20, 2019 - 12:48 am
COEBURN, Va. (AP) — Former coal miner John Robinson's bills for black lung treatments run $4,000 a month, but the federal fund he depends on to help cover them is being drained of money because of inaction by Congress and the Trump administration. Amid the turmoil of the government shutdown this...
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FILE - In this Monday, March 4, 2019, file photo, Kevin Hassett, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, talks to media outside of the White House in Washington. Contrary to most economists, the Trump administration expects the U.S. economy to keep booming over the next decade on the strength of further tax cuts, reduced regulation and improvements to the nation’s infrastructure. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 18, 2019 - 11:13 pm
Contrary to the views of most economists, the Trump administration expects the U.S. economy to keep booming over the next decade on the strength of further tax cuts, reduced regulation and improvements to the nation's infrastructure. The annual report from President Donald Trump's Council of...
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March 18, 2019 - 1:38 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Foxconn Technology Group said Monday that its manufacturing facility in Wisconsin will be producing flat-screen panels by the end of 2020, with construction starting later this year. The news came after the worldwide electronics manufacturing leader sent mixed signals earlier...
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This Feb. 13, 2019, shows multiple forms printed from the Internal Revenue Service web page that are used for 2018 U.S. federal tax returns in Zelienople, Pa. For taxpayers who itemize, the 2 percent miscellaneous itemized deduction was a handy catchall bucket for expenses such as investment fees and expenses and tax-preparation fees. It wasn’t easy to qualify for this deduction, your expenses had to top 2 percent of your adjusted gross income before you could claim them, but it was a nice option to have. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
March 15, 2019 - 10:56 am
Americans will face a slew of new rules during the first tax-filing season with the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 in effect. Here's what changed for investors: 1. NO DEDUCTION FOR INVESTMENT EXPENSES For taxpayers who itemize, the 2 percent miscellaneous itemized deduction was a handy catchall...
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March 14, 2019 - 9:26 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (mih-NOO'-shin) is suggesting he will protect President Donald Trump's privacy if he receives a request from House Democrats for Trump's tax returns. At a House Ways and Means Committee hearing Thursday, Mnuchin was asked whether he would meet a...
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In this Thursday, March 7, 2019 photo, New Mexico state Rep. Javier Martinez of Albuquerque, right, rallies support for a bill to authorize recreational marijuana consumption and sales through state-owned stores in Santa Fe, N.M. New Mexico took a step toward legalizing recreational marijuana when its House approved a bill that would allow state-run stores and require customers to carry a receipt with their cannabis or face penalties. The measure, narrowly approved Thursday, March 7, 2019, following a late-night floor debate, mixes major provisions of a Republican-backed Senate bill that emphasizes aggressive regulation with a draft by Democrats concerned about the U.S. war on drugs. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee)
March 12, 2019 - 9:13 pm
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico would become the first U.S. state to set up its own government-operated marijuana stores and subsidize medical cannabis for the poor under a bill brokered between Republicans and Democrats, as a new wave of states weighs legislation that would legalize recreational...
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Office of Management and Budget Acting Director Russell Vought testifies before the House Budget Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 12, 2019, during a hearing on the fiscal year 2020 budget. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 12, 2019 - 10:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House's top budget official acknowledged Tuesday that the federal deficit is ballooning to $1.1 trillion alongside the Republican tax plan but vowed the fiscal picture would improve as a result of projected economic growth. Russ Vought, acting director of the Office of...
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House Budget Committee Chair John Yarmuth, D-Ky., walks through the Capitol in Washington, Monday morning March 11, 2019, as President Donald Trump's 2020 budget is delivered to his committee. Trump's new budget calls for billions more for his border wall, with steep cuts in domestic programs but increases for military spending. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 11, 2019 - 3:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — "Medicare for All" has become catnip for Democratic presidential candidates and many lawmakers, yet Republicans prepping for next year's congressional races are also flocking to it — for entirely different reasons. GOP strategists say they'll use proposals to expand government-run...
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FILE- In this Jan. 16, 2019, file photo Julian Castro, former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, speaks to the media at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. Castro isn’t ruling out direct payments to African-Americans for the legacy of slavery, a stand separating him from his 2020 rivals. The former housing secretary says, “If under the Constitution we compensate people because we take their property, why wouldn’t you compensate people who actually were property.’’ (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm, File)
March 10, 2019 - 11:20 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro isn't ruling out direct payments to African-Americans for the legacy of slavery — a stand separating him from his 2020 rivals. "If under the Constitution we compensate people because we take their property, why wouldn't you...
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In this March 6, 2019, photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. The federal budget deficit is ballooning on Trump’s watch and few in Washington seem to care. And the political dynamics that enabled bipartisan deficit-cutting deals decades ago has disappeared. That’s the reality that will greet Trump’s latest budget, which probably will promptly be shelved after it’s received by Congress on Monday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
March 10, 2019 - 7:34 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal budget deficit is ballooning on President Donald Trump's watch and few in Washington seem to care. And even if they did, the political dynamics that enabled bipartisan deficit-cutting deals decades ago has disappeared, replaced by bitter partisanship and chronic...
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