Higher education

National Collegiate Athletic Association Student-Athlete Advisory Committee Chair Kendall Spencer, right, and National College Players Association Executive Director Ramogi Huma, center, listen as National Collegiate Athletic Association President Mark Emmert, left, testifies during a Senate Commerce subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020, on intercollegiate athlete compensation. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
May 08, 2020 - 8:51 pm
NCAA President Mark Emmert says the coronavirus is making it unlikely all schools will be ready to begin competing in college sports at the same time. The goal, he said Friday night, is for every team to have an equal amount of preparation time before its season starts, and there could be some...
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Euro Treasures Antiques owner Scott Evans poses next to a "thank You" sign Friday, May 8, 2020, in Salt Lake City. Evans is closing his art and antique store after 40 years. With a drastic drop in customers due to COVID-19 concerns and shelter-in-place orders, Evans says it was no longer cost effective to stay open. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
May 08, 2020 - 7:38 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — Brutal. Horrific. Tragic. Choose your description. The April jobs report showed, in harrowing detail, just how terribly the coronavirus outbreak has pummeled the U.S. economy. Most obviously, there's the 14.7% unemployment rate, the highest since the Great Depression. And the...
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FILE - In this April 3, 2019, file photo, actress Lori Loughlin, front, and her husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, left, depart federal court in Boston. The judge overseeing the case against Loughlin, Giannulli and other parents charged with cheating the college admissions process called allegations of misconduct by investigators “serious and disturbing” Friday, April 17, 2020. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
May 08, 2020 - 1:07 pm
A federal judge refused Friday to dismiss charges against actress Lori Loughlin, her fashion designer husband and other prominent parents accused of cheating the college admissions process, siding with prosecutors who denied that investigators had fabricated evidence. U.S. District Judge Nathaniel...
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A man wears a face mask to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus as he walks past an art installation outside the National Gallery of Art in Washington, Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The District of Columbia is under a stay-home order for all residents in an effort to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
May 07, 2020 - 4:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The decision to wear a mask in public is becoming a political statement — a moment to pick sides in a brewing culture war over containing the coronavirus. While not yet as loaded as a “Make America Great Again” hat, the mask is increasingly a visual shorthand for a debate pitting...
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People pass by wearing face masks to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus as ride along a street in Beijing, Wednesday, May 6, 2020. China on Wednesday reported just two new cases of the coronavirus and no deaths. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
KNSS News
May 06, 2020 - 11:55 pm
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — UN increases amount of appeal to fight coronavirus...
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FILE - In this March 27, 2020, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room in Washington. The U.S. Education Department is promising to process student loan forgiveness claims for nearly 170,000 borrowers within 18 months as part of a proposed settlement announced Friday in a federal lawsuit filed in California. The lawsuit alleged that DeVos illegally stalled a program known as borrower defense to repayment, which forgives federal student loans for borrowers who are cheated by their colleges. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
KNSS News
May 06, 2020 - 11:22 am
The U.S. Education Department on Wednesday finalized campus sexual assault rules that bolster the rights of the accused, reduce legal liabilities for schools and colleges, and narrow the scope of cases schools will be required to investigate. The change announced by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos...
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In this Tuesday, April 28, 2020, photo, Alexander Faigen, of Augusta University's Dental College of Georgia, shows how far a nasal swab must be inserted in Augusta, Ga. Volunteers at a Georgia dental college who started using a 3D printer to make nasal swabs used in test kits for the coronavirus are now a major part of the state's effort to expand testing. (AP Photo/Ron Harris)
May 04, 2020 - 12:15 am
AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — Seeing a chance to help amid a shortage of kits to test people for the coronavirus, Dr. Jeffrey James dedicated a 3D printer at the dental college where he teaches to churning out nasal swabs at a rate of 300 per day. Then Georgia officials working with Gov. Brian Kemp heard...
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FILE - In this May 15, 2019, file photo Drexel University in Philadelphia. Students at more than 25 universities are filing lawsuits demanding tuition refunds from their schools after finding that the online classes they are being offered do not match up to the classroom experience. Grainger Rickenbaker, a freshman who filed a class action lawsuit against Drexel University in Philadelphia, said the online classes he’s been taking are poor substitutes for classroom learning. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
May 03, 2020 - 11:59 pm
They wanted the campus experience, but their colleges sent them home to learn online during the coronavirus pandemic. Now, students at more than 25 U.S. universities are filing lawsuits against their schools demanding partial refunds on tuition and campus fees, saying they’re not getting the...
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May 01, 2020 - 11:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The stated mission of The Greater New York Hospital Association is simple enough: to help members deliver “the finest patient care in the most cost-effective way.” But it’s more complicated than that. While the association, which represents health care providers at the epicenter...
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FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2020, file photo, Michelle Janavs arrives at federal court in Boston for sentencing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Lawyers for Janavs, who is supposed to report to prison in May, said in a legal filing Wednesday, April 22, 2020, that she should spend five months in home confinement instead of prison because she has an underlying health condition that makes her particularly vulnerable if she were to contract the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
May 01, 2020 - 2:47 pm
An heir to the Hot Pockets fortune and a former investment executive who participated in the college admissions cheating scheme won't get to serve their punishments at home, but they can delay going to prison until this summer because of the coronavirus pandemic, a judge has ruled. Michelle Janavs...
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