Human welfare

Rohingya refugees Sitara Begum with her son Mohammed Abbas, who are in the list for repatriation wait in their shelter at Jamtoli refugee camp, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. Bangladesh authorities said Thursday that repatriation to Myanmar of some of the more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims who fled army-led violence will begin as scheduled if people are willing to go, despite calls from United Nations officials and human rights groups for the refugees' safety in their homeland to be verified first. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
November 15, 2018 - 12:42 am
COX'S BAZAR, Bangladesh (AP) — Bangladesh authorities said the repatriation of Rohingya Muslims who fled army-led violence in Myanmar will begin as scheduled Thursday if people are willing to go, despite calls from United Nations officials and human rights groups to hold off. Refugee commissioner...
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Rohingya Muslims Nurul Amin, 35, left, and Mohammed Selim, 23, whose names are on the first list to be repatriated back to Myanmar, talk to the Associated Press outside Jamtoli refugee camp, in Bangladesh, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. Bangladesh authorities said they are ready to begin repatriating some of the more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims who have fled from army-led violence in Myanmar since last year, but refugees scheduled to leave said they would refuse to go because of fears for their safety. "I will not go. My wife and other family members have gone elsewhere, they do not want to go," Amin told The Associated Press. Selim said his wife and seven other family members went into hiding after finding out that they would be sent back Thursday. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
November 14, 2018 - 6:44 pm
COX'S BAZAR, Bangladesh (AP) — Bangladesh authorities said they are ready to begin repatriating some of the more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims who have fled from army-led violence in Myanmar since last year. But refugees scheduled to leave said they would refuse to go because of fears for their...
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These undated images released by the Ohio Attorney General's office, show from left, George "Billy" Wagner III, Angela Wagner, George Wagner IV and Edward "Jake" Wagner. Authorities announced Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018, that the family of four has been arrested in the slayings of eight members of one family in rural Ohio two years ago. (Ohio Attorney General's office via AP)
November 14, 2018 - 4:04 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A child at the center of a custody dispute that may have set off a gruesome Ohio massacre is safe in state custody, her great-grandfather said Wednesday, before one of the four suspects in the killings appeared in court. Leonard Manley, whose daughter and grandchildren were...
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Italian Interior Minister and Deputy Premier Matteo Salvini speaks to children upon their arrival in Pratica di Mare's military airport, near Rome, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. A group of 51 refugees and asylum seekers from Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia and Cameroon, arrived in Italy from Niger, where they had been transferred to after being held in Libyan detention centers. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
November 14, 2018 - 8:31 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — The Latest on migrants in Europe (all times local): 3:30 p.m. Italy's hard-line interior minister has welcomed 51 refugees and asylum-seekers who arrived in Italy after being detained in Libya and then airlifted out by the U.N. refugee agency. Matteo Salvini, whose crackdown on...
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A security official stands at a gate for a secured area ahead of the APEC Economic Leaders' Week Summit in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. After three decades of promoting free trade as a panacea to poverty, the APEC grouping of nations that includes the U.S. and China is holding its lavish annual leaders meeting in the country that can least afford it. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 14, 2018 - 2:52 am
PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea (AP) — After three decades of promoting free trade as a panacea to poverty, the APEC grouping of nations that includes the U.S. and China is holding its lavish annual leaders' meeting in the country that can least afford it. Barely penetrated by roads and scarred by...
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A portion of a once-classified CIA report that disclosed the existence of a drug research program dubbed "Project Medication" is photographed in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug that might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The American Civil Liberties Union fought in court to have the report released. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
November 14, 2018 - 12:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce...
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A former dock facility is shown with old transfer bridges, with "Long Island" painted in large letters at Gantry State Park in the Long Island City section of Queens Borough in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. Amazon announced Tuesday it has selected the Queens neighborhood as one of two sites for its headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
November 14, 2018 - 12:18 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Much of the New York City neighborhood selected by Amazon for one of its new headquarters is in a federal "opportunity zone," a designation created by President Donald Trump's tax overhaul that offers developers potentially millions of dollars in capital gains tax breaks to invest...
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A portion of a once-classified CIA report that disclosed the existence of a drug research program dubbed "Project Medication" is photographed in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug that might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The American Civil Liberties Union fought in court to have the report released. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
November 13, 2018 - 10:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce...
Read More
These undated images released by the Ohio Attorney General's office, show from left, George "Billy" Wagner III, Angela Wagner, George Wagner IV and Edward "Jake" Wagner. Authorities announced Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018, that the family of four has been arrested in the slayings of eight members of one family in rural Ohio two years ago. (Ohio Attorney General's office via AP)
November 13, 2018 - 9:31 pm
WAVERLY, Ohio (AP) — Authorities arrested a family of four Tuesday in the gruesome 2016 slayings of eight people from another family in rural Ohio, a crime that prosecutors suggested stemmed from a custody dispute. The announcement marked the culmination of a massive investigative effort that began...
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FILE - In this June 26, 2018 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar speaks during a Senate Finance Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration is opening the door for states to provide more inpatient treatment for people with serious mental illness by tapping their Medicaid programs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar made the announcement Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 13, 2018 - 11:44 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration Tuesday allowed states to provide more inpatient treatment for people with serious mental illness by tapping Medicaid, a potentially far-reaching move to address issues from homelessness to violence. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar made the...
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