Insects

Sven Spichiger, Washington State Department of Agriculture managing entomologist, walks with a canister of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a nest in a tree behind him Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Blaine, Wash. Scientists in Washington state discovered the first nest earlier in the week of so-called murder hornets in the United States and worked to wipe it out Saturday morning to protect native honeybees. Workers with the state Agriculture Department spent weeks searching, trapping and using dental floss to tie tracking devices to Asian giant hornets, which can deliver painful stings to people and spit venom but are the biggest threat to honeybees that farmers depend on to pollinate crops. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
KNSS News
October 27, 2020 - 12:56 am
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Workers from the state Department of Agriculture managed to destroy the first nest of so-called murder hornets discovered in the U.S. without suffering any stings or other injuries, the agency said Monday. The nest, located in Whatcom County near the Canadian border, created...
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In this Oct. 7, 2020, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a live Asian giant hornet with a tracking device affixed to it sits on an apple in a tree where it was placed, near Blaine, Wash. Washington state officials say they were again unsuccessful at live-tracking an Asian giant hornet while trying to find and destroy a nest of the so-called murder hornets. The Washington State Department of Agriculture said Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, that an entomologist used dental floss to tie a tracking device on a female hornet, only to lose signs of her when she went into the forest. (Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
October 23, 2020 - 12:57 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in...
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This 2016 photo provided by the University of California, Irvine, shows a diabolical ironclad beetle, which can withstand being crushed by forces almost 40,000 times its body weight and are native to desert habitats in Southern California. Scientists say the armor of the seemingly indestructible beetle could offer clues for designing stronger planes and buildings. In a study published Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020, in the journal Nature, a group of scientists explains why the beetle is so squash-resistant. (Jesus Rivera, Kisailus Biomimetics and Nanostructured Materials Lab, University of California Irvine via AP)
October 21, 2020 - 10:14 am
NEW YORK (AP) — It's a beetle that can withstand bird pecks, animal stomps and even being rolled over by a Toyota Camry. Now scientists are studying what the bug’s crush-resistant shell could teach them about designing stronger planes and buildings. “This beetle is super tough," said Purdue...
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October 12, 2020 - 3:51 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state officials said Monday they were again unsuccessful at live-tracking a “murder” hornet while trying to find and destroy a nest of the giant insects. The Washington State Department of Agriculture said an entomologist used dental floss to tie a tracking device on a...
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A model wears a creation for the Kenzo Spring-Summer 2021 fashion collection, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, during Paris fashion week. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP)
September 30, 2020 - 8:30 am
PARIS (AP) — A hybrid Paris Fashion Week continued Wednesday featuring a stand out live runway show from socially-distanced Kenzo, but no sign of any A-list celebrities. Here are some highlights: KENZO GETS ALL THE BUZZ Kenzo’s show was a fairy story in nature. Guests smiled as they breathed in the...
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September 23, 2020 - 3:12 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Four former eBay Inc. employees have agreed to plead guilty to their roles in a campaign of intimidation that included sending live spiders and cockroaches to the home of a Massachusetts couple who ran an online newsletter highly critical of the auction site, federal prosecutors said...
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A bee rests on a yellow sign that reads "Bees on Board" on beekeeper Sean Kennedy's truck as he helps capture a swarm of honey bees and relocate them to a bee hive, Friday, May 1, 2020, in Washington. The District of Columbia has declared beekeepers as essential workers during the coronavirus outbreak. If the swarm isn’t collected by a beekeeper, the new hive can come to settle in residential backyards, attics, crawlspaces, or other potentially ruinous areas, creating a stinging, scary nuisance. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
July 11, 2020 - 5:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — “Excuse me, can I ask what you’re doing here?” a resident in a southeast Washington neighborhood asks as Sean Kennedy and Erin Gleeson get out of their truck and scour the streets. The sign on their back windshield, “Bees Onboard,” gives them away. Kennedy, 58, and Gleeson, 36,...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2019, file photo, the queen bee (marked in green) and worker bees move around a hive at the Veterans Affairs in Manchester, N.H. The annual survey released Monday, June 22, 2020, of U.S. beekeepers found that honeybee colonies are doing better after a bad year. Monday's survey found winter losses were lower than normal, the second smallest in 14 years of records. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
June 22, 2020 - 1:05 pm
American honeybee colonies have bounced back after a bad year, the annual beekeeping survey finds. Beekeepers only lost 22.2% of their colonies this past winter, from Oct. 1 to March 31, which is lower than the average of 28.6%, according to the Bee Informed Partnership’s annual survey of thousands...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Monday, June 8, 2020, a man rides his bike along banks of flowers on a small road on the outskirts of Frankfurt, Germany. Friends of the Earth Europe and a think-tank say in a report released Tuesday June 9, 2020, that more than 40% of the world’s insect species are in decline because of industrial farming and heavy pesticide use, and the endangered pollinators could in turn endanger global food production.(AP Photo/Michael Probst, FILE)
June 09, 2020 - 8:47 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — Environmental groups are urging the European Union to take drastic action to protect insects, saying in a report Tuesday that more than 40% of the world’s insect species are in decline because of pesticide use and industrial farming. Friends of the Earth Europe and the Heinrich-Böll...
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In this Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a dead Asian giant hornet is photographed in a lab in Olympia, Wash. The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the "Murder Hornet" by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Quinlyn Baine/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
KNSS News
May 04, 2020 - 9:21 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch killer dubbed the "Murder Hornet" with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state, where entomologists were making plans to wipe it out. The giant Asian insect, with a sting that could be fatal to some people, is just...
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