Invasive species

A bison rubs against a bush at a wildlife sanctuary in Milovice, Czech Republic, Friday, July 17, 2020. Wild horses, bison and other big-hoofed animals once roamed freely in much of Europe. Now they are transforming a former military base outside the Czech capital in an ambitious project to improve biodiversity. Where occupying Soviet troops once held exercises, massive bovines called tauros and other heavy beasts now munch on the invasive plants that took over the base years ago. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
August 08, 2020 - 2:36 pm
MILOVICE, Czech Republic (AP) — Wild horses, bison and other big-hoofed animals once roamed freely in much of Europe. Now they are transforming a former military base outside the Czech capital in an ambitious project to improve biodiversity. Where occupying Soviet troops once held exercises,...
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FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 23, 2019, file photo, female northern white rhinos Fatu, right, and Najin, left, the last two northern white rhinos on the planet, are fed some carrots by a ranger in their enclosure at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, in Kenya. Although scientists have long focused on the world’s predators, a massive new study finds that herbivores, critters that eat plants, are the animals most at risk of extinction. A bit more than one in four species of herbivores are considered threatened, endangered or vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the world’s scientific authority on extinction risk, according to a study published Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020, in the journal Science Advances. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
August 05, 2020 - 1:23 pm
Although scientists often worry most about the loss of the world’s predators, a comprehensive new study finds that plant-eating herbivores are the animals most at risk of extinction. About one in four species of herbivores, 25.5%, are considered threatened, endangered or vulnerable by the...
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In this Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a dead Asian giant hornet is photographed in a lab in Olympia, Wash. The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the "Murder Hornet" by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Quinlyn Baine/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
KNSS News
May 04, 2020 - 9:21 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch killer dubbed the "Murder Hornet" with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state, where entomologists were making plans to wipe it out. The giant Asian insect, with a sting that could be fatal to some people, is just...
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This 2005 photo provided by Bethany Bradley shows cheatgrass, at right, invading shrubs, left, near Lovelock, Nev. A new study finds that for much of the United States, invasive grass species, such as cheatgrass, are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California. (Bethany Bradley/University of Massachusetts via AP)
November 04, 2019 - 2:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For much of the United States, invasive grass species are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California, a new study finds. Twelve non-native species act as "little arsonist grasses," said study co-author Bethany Bradley, a University of Massachusetts...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011, file photo, a lemur looks through the forest at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Andasibe, Madagascar. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso, File)
May 06, 2019 - 11:23 am
People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. But it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2012 file photo a man tosses dirt on a fire as he tries to save his home on Bettas Road near Cle Elum, Wash. Federal officials have released a plan to save sagebrush habitats in Western states that support cattle ranching, recreation and 350 wildlife species, including imperiled sage grouse. Officials say the 248-page document released this month is a paradigm shift relying on advances in technology and analytics to categorize sagebrush areas based on resistance and resilience to wildfire. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson,File)
April 23, 2019 - 1:19 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A new plan to save sagebrush habitats in Western states that support cattle ranching, recreation and 350 wildlife species — including imperiled sage grouse — is a paradigm shift in strategy, federal officials said. The 248-page document released this month emphasizes new...
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FILE - This June 22, 2017, file photo provided by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources shows a silver carp, a variety of Asian carp, that was caught in the Illinois Waterway below T.J. O'Brien Lock and Dam, approximately nine miles away from Lake Michigan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has released a final $778 million plan to keep Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes by strengthening defenses at a lock-and-dam complex in Illinois. The price tag is much higher than the estimated cost of a tentative version of the strategy released in 2017. (Illinois Department of Natural Resources via AP, File)
November 28, 2018 - 4:39 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Fortifying an Illinois waterway to prevent invasive carp from using it as a path to Lake Michigan could cost nearly three times as much as federal planners previously thought, according to an updated report. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers this week released a final...
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In this July 27, 2018 photo, Susan Hewitt photographs a daisy-like weed known as 'shaggy soldier' and adds it to iNaturalist, the app she uses to participate in the New York City EcoFlora project. "If people could just take a few minutes to look at nature closely, I think they would be blown away," Hewitt said. Hundreds of New Yorkers are working with researchers to find and catalog wild plants in their city. They’re taking pictures with their smartphones as they walk the streets. Participants have already found invasive species, plants never documented before in New York City, and endangered native weeds. (AP Photo/Emiliano Rodriguez Mega)
August 03, 2018 - 9:01 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of New Yorkers are working with researchers to find and catalog wild plants in their city. They're taking pictures with their smartphones as they walk the streets. Since the project began last year, participants have found invasive species, plants never documented before in...
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March 15, 2018 - 6:09 pm
Western U.S. governors have compiled their first region-wide list of the worst invasive species for their states. The Western Governors' Association Thursday released a compilation of 50 pests ranging from weeds and wild boars to insects and amphibians. The governors want to prioritize efforts to...
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Dreamstime
November 14, 2017 - 3:08 am
Southern states appear to be losing ground to the Chinese tallow, a highly invasive tree overtaking forests from Texas to Florida. Tallows are dangerous because they grow three times faster than most native hardwoods, outcompeting southern maples, oaks, elms and cypress for space and resources...
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