Labor economy

FILE - In this May 21, 2020 file photo, a man looks at signs of a closed store due to COVID-19 in Niles, Ill. U.S. layoffs surged in April revealing the deep economic hole that comes with shuttered offices, restaurants, stores and schools. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
June 09, 2020 - 4:20 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — U.S. employers laid off 7.7 million workers in April — a sign of just how deep the economic hole is after the closure of thousands of offices, restaurants, stores and schools during the pandemic. The Labor Department also said in a Tuesday report that job openings plummeted and...
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A woman walks into a closing Gordmans store, Thursday, May 28, 2020, in St. Charles, Mo. Stage Stores, which owns Gordmans, is closing all its stores and has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
June 08, 2020 - 5:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy entered a recession in February as the coronavirus struck the nation, a group of economists declared Monday, ending the longest expansion on record. The economists said that employment, income and spending peaked in February and then fell sharply afterward as the...
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A currency trader watches monitors at the foreign exchange dealing room of the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, June 8, 2020. Shares have advanced in Asia Monday after surprisingly strong U.S. jobs figures helped power a surge on Wall Street. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
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June 08, 2020 - 4:05 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street’s enthusiasm about the reopening economy sent stocks scrambling even higher on Monday, and the Nasdaq composite wiped away the last of its coronavirus-induced losses to set a record. The broader S&P 500 climbed back within 4.5% of its own record as optimism...
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FILE - In this May 11, 2020, file photo light shines in a patient pod at a temporary alternate care site constructed in response to the coronavirus outbreak inside the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington. People are still more likely to prefer the private sector than the government on driving innovation in health care, improving quality and, by a narrower margin, providing coverage, according to the survey by the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, FIle)
June 08, 2020 - 7:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus pushed hospitals to the edge, and millions of workers lost job-based coverage in the economic shutdown to slow the spread, but a new poll suggests Americans have remarkably little interest in big changes to health care as a result of the pandemic. People are still...
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A mosque official takes the temperature reading of a man entering the Cut Meutia mosque to attend a Friday prayer amid concerns of coronavirus outbreak in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 5, 2020. Muslims in Indonesia's capital held their first communal Friday prayers as mosques closed by the coronavirus outbreak for nine weeks reopened at half capacity. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
June 07, 2020 - 11:02 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Data from the New Mexico Health Department shows COVID-19 infections among health care workers in the state have spiked as intensive care units remain full and nurses and first responders call for more protective equipment. The data shows 492 workers were diagnosed in May,...
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FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2020, file photo Democratic presidential candidates former Vice President Joe Biden, takes the stage before a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by CNN and the Des Moines Register in Des Moines, Iowa. Biden has won the last few delegates he needed to clinch the Democratic nomination for president. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
June 06, 2020 - 11:50 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — It seemed easy to write off Joe Biden. The former vice president came across as easily blindsided at debates. The crowds at his presidential campaign speeches were far from stadium size. Other Democratic candidates such as Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg each...
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FILE - In this June 4, 2020, file photo Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., arrives for a Republican luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
June 06, 2020 - 10:44 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A stronger than expected jobs report could further scramble an already uncertain picture for passing a fifth and possibly final coronavirus aid bill. The positive statistics are feeding the wait-and-see approach of the White House and its GOP allies in Congress. Republicans say...
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FILE - In this Thursday, March 19, 2020, file photo, a public school employee sanitizes a sink in a bathroom at a U.S. high school. Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services, from schools to trash pickup. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
June 06, 2020 - 10:19 am
Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services — from schools to trash pickup. Even as the U.S. added some jobs in May, the number of...
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Benjamin Lund is seen Friday June 5, 2020, in Milwaukee. Lund is a longtime Republican who was raised in a conservative family in the political battleground of Wisconsin, now plans to vote a straight Democratic ticket and rejects any effort by Trump to put a "silver lining" on the nation's pain. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)
June 06, 2020 - 7:37 am
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — At the end of one of his most turbulent weeks in office, President Donald Trump was eager on Friday to boast of a better than expected jobs report to argue the country is poised for a booming recovery. Benjamin Lund was not moved. The 45-year-old Milwaukee man is a longtime...
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In this June 1, 2020, photo President Donald Trump returns to the White House after visiting outside St. John's Church in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
June 06, 2020 - 6:56 am
CHICAGO (AP) — President Donald Trump has always been a big numbers guy. He’s proved adept at taking even the grimmest numbers and giving himself a pat on the back or relying on a creative use of data to make himself look good. But his declaration that an unexpected dip in the unemployment rate...
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