Land restoration and reclamation

FILE - In this June 11, 2018, file photo, flames consume trees during a burnout operation that was performed south of County Road 202 near Durango, Colo. A report by the U.S. Geological Survey shows investments made to reduce the risk of wildfire in forested areas are paying dividends when it comes to creating jobs and infusing money in local economies. The study focused on several counties along the New Mexico-Colorado border that make up the watershed of the Rio Grande. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP, File)
February 19, 2020 - 4:21 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Projects to reduce the risk of wildfires and protect water sources in the U.S. West have created jobs and infused more money in local economies, researchers say, and they were funded by a partnership between governments and businesses that has become a model in other...
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FILE - This Aug. 2018, file aerial photo shows preliminary construction work off Henoko, in Nago city, Okinawa prefecture, Japan, where the Japanese government plans to relocate a U.S. air base from one area of Okinawa's main island to another. Okinawa Gov. Denny Tamaki urged Japan's central government to stop the construction it unilaterally started to allow a U.S. Marine Corps. base to relocate to a less-crowded area of the southern Japanese island despite local opposition, responding to a new defense ministry estimate that it would take more than twice the time and cost than previously thought to get the base closed and returned to Okinawan sovereignty. (Koji Harada/Kyodo News via AP, File)
December 26, 2019 - 12:45 am
TOKYO (AP) — Okinawa's Gov. Denny Tamaki renewed demands Thursday that Japan's central government halt construction of a U.S. Marine Corps. base being relocated to a less-crowded area of the southern Japanese island despite vehement local opposition. Tamaki was responding to a defense ministry...
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FILE - In this Jan. 2, 2016, file photo, rancher Dwight Hammond Jr. greets protesters outside his home in Burns, Ore. Dwight and Steven Hammond who were convicted in 2012 of intentionally setting fires on public land in Oregon have had their grazing rights restored. The Oregonian/OregonLive reports that former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, in one of his last actions before resigning, ordered the renewal of a 10-year grazing permit for Hammond Ranches Inc., run by Hammond and his son Steven Hammond. The decision was dated Jan. 2, 2019, but wasn't sent out until this week. (Les Zaitz/The Oregonian via AP, File)
January 29, 2019 - 5:37 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The two Oregon ranchers whose conviction for intentionally setting fires on public land sparked a weeks-long standoff with anti-federal government protesters at a remote wildlife refuge have had their grazing rights restored. Former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, in one of his...
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In this Saturday, July 21, 2018, photo, firefighters spray water to extinguish a forest fire in Pali, South Sumatra, Indonesia. Researchers say a plan by the Indonesian government to give plantation companies new lands in exchange for restoring areas they destroyed could result in more tropical forests being cut down. (AP Photo/Iwan Cheristian )
July 24, 2018 - 5:59 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Researchers say an Indonesian government plan to give plantation companies new lands in exchange for restoring areas they destroyed could result in more tropical forests being cut down. Spatial analysis released Tuesday by civil society groups shows 40 percent of the 921,...
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