Logistical and moving services

File - In this July 26, 2018, file photo, U.S. Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt waits to speak during the annual state of Colorado energy luncheon sponsored by the Colorado Petroleum council in Denver. The headquarters of the U.S. government's largest land agency will move from the nation's capital to western Colorado, a Republican senator said Monday, July 15, 2019, a high-profile component of the Trump administration's plan to reorganize management of the nation's natural resources. Rep. Raul M. Grijalva, D-Arizona, chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, attacked the headquarters move and noted that Grand Junction is not far from Interior Secretary David Bernhardt's hometown of Rifle, Colorado. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
July 16, 2019 - 6:56 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration said Tuesday that it can save taxpayers millions of dollars, make better decisions and trim a "top heavy" office in Washington by moving the headquarters of the nation's biggest land agency to Colorado and dispersing scores of jobs across 11 states in the U.S...
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FILE - This Feb. 1, 2010, file photo shows a Marathon gas station pump in Indianapolis. Oil refiner Marathon Petroleum Corp. is buying Andeavor Logistics in a deal worth about $9 billion that’ll grow its pipeline and storage business and expand its geographic reach. Marathon will combine its midstream subsidiary MPLX with Andeavor, both master limited partnerships. Andeavor unitholders will receive 1.135 MPLX common units for each Andeavor common unit held. Marathon said Wednesday, May 8, 2019, that it will receive 1.0328 MPLX common units for each Andeavor common unit held. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, File)
May 08, 2019 - 7:03 am
FINDLAY, Ohio (AP) — Marathon Petroleum Corp. is merging two of its oil and gas pipeline, transportation and storage operations for $9 billion. MPLX and Andeavor Logistics are both master limited partnerships majority owned by Marathon, which raised the possibility that it might combine the two...
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Central American migrants traveling in a caravan to the U.S. border walk on a road in Pijijiapan, Mexico, Monday, April 22, 2019. The outpouring of aid that once greeted Central American migrants as they trekked in caravans through southern Mexico has been drying up, so this group is hungrier, advancing slowly or not at all, and hounded by unhelpful local officials. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
April 22, 2019 - 3:01 pm
PIJIJIAPAN, Mexico (AP) — Mexican police and immigration agents detained hundreds of Central American migrants Monday in the largest single raid on a migrant caravan since the groups started moving through Mexico last year. Police targeted isolated groups at the tail end of a caravan of about 3,000...
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March 26, 2019 - 12:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is moving to break up a group of Iranian-linked companies that has transferred around $1 billion to Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions on the country. The Treasury says it's hitting a network of 25 people, firms and Iranian government agencies with...
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Protesters on canoes display placard as construction workers dumped a truckload of sediment on the ground and bulldozed it into the sea at Henoko on Okinawa’s east coast to build a runway for a Marine Corps base, Friday, Dec. 14, 2018. Japan's central government started main reclamation work Friday at a disputed U.S. military base relocation site on the southern island of Okinawa despite fierce local opposition. (Koji Harada/Kyodo News via AP)
December 13, 2018 - 10:35 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central government started main reclamation work Friday at a disputed U.S. military base relocation site on the southern island of Okinawa despite fierce local opposition. Construction workers dumped a truckload of sediment and bulldozed it into the sea at Henoko on Okinawa's...
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Protesters on boats oppose as workers of Japan's central government resumed work at a disputed U.S. military base relocation site on the southern island of Okinawa, at Henoko in Nago city, Okinawa prefecture, Japan, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. The Defense Ministry's local branch said an early stage of landfill work at Henoko on Okinawa's east coast began Thursday morning.(Koji Harada/Kyodo News via AP)
October 31, 2018 - 10:34 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central government resumed work at a disputed U.S. military base relocation site on Okinawa on Thursday even though residents see the project as an undemocratic imposition on the small southern island. An early stage of landfill work at Henoko on Okinawa's east coast began...
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Haley Nelson inspects damages to her family properties in the Panama City, Fla., spring field area after Hurricane Michael made landfall in Florida's Panhandle on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods before continuing its march inland. (Pedro Portal/Miami Herald via AP)
October 10, 2018 - 10:11 pm
PANAMA CITY, Florida (AP) — The Latest on Hurricane Michael (all times Eastern): 11 p.m. Forecasters say Michael is weakening but still a hurricane with 75-mph (120-kph) winds as it crosses central Georgia. The National Hurricane Center said Michael was located at 11 p.m. EDT Wednesday about 45...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 3:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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