Medical ethics

FILE - In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019 file photo, August Mulvihill, of Norwalk, Iowa, center, holds a sign depicting a wire clothes hanger during a rally at the Statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa, to protest recent abortion bans. On Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, a federal judge in New York struck down a rule letting health care clinicians object to providing abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
November 06, 2019 - 12:21 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday struck down a new rule, not yet in effect, that allowed health care providers to refuse participation in abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds. U.S. District Judge Paul A. Engelmayer in New York said he was tossing out the rule in...
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In this May 2, 2019, photo, Savanah Harshbarger, a medical student at Duke University, poses for a photo on campus in Durham, N.C. Harshbarger estimates she did as many as 10 pelvic exams last year on patients who were under anesthesia for gynecologic surgeries. Bills introduced in roughly a dozen states this year would require that women undergoing gynecological surgeries give explicit approval to a pelvic exam beforehand. It’s a step that some medical experts say is an unnecessary intrusion into care. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
May 12, 2019 - 3:42 pm
Savanah Harshbarger estimates she performed as many as 10 pelvic exams last year on patients before gynecologic surgeries, feeling for fibroid tumors or other abnormalities. The Duke University medical student said the experience was a revelation. "It's pretty empowering to know this is something...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a National Day of Prayer event in the Rose Garden of the White House, Thursday May 2, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
May 03, 2019 - 5:28 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Advancing his anti-abortion agenda, President Donald Trump moved Thursday to protect health care workers who object to procedures like abortion on moral or religious grounds. Trump chose the National Day of Prayer to announce the new regulation. "Just today we finalized new...
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This June 2018 photo shows protesters walking along Montana Avenue outside the El Paso Processing Center, in El Paso, Texas. Federal immigration officials are force feeding some of the immigrants who have been on hunger strike for nearly a month inside the Texas detention facility, The Associated Press has learned. (Rudy Gutierrez/The El Paso Times via AP)
January 31, 2019 - 12:16 pm
Immigrants around the country have staged hunger strikes over the past month to protest conditions inside detention facilities, prompting officials to force-feed six of them through plastic nasal tubes at a Texas location, The Associated Press has learned. The El Paso Processing Center has become...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui is reflected in a glass panel as he works at a computer at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 27, 2018 - 5:40 pm
SHENZHEN, China (AP) — The Chinese scientist who says he helped make the world's first gene-edited babies veered off a traditional career path, keeping much of his research secret in pursuit of a larger goal — making history. He Jiankui's outsized aspirations began to take shape in 2016, the year...
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A portion of a once-classified CIA report that disclosed the existence of a drug research program dubbed "Project Medication" is photographed in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug that might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The American Civil Liberties Union fought in court to have the report released. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
November 14, 2018 - 12:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce...
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A portion of a once-classified CIA report that disclosed the existence of a drug research program dubbed "Project Medication" is photographed in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug that might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The American Civil Liberties Union fought in court to have the report released. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
November 13, 2018 - 10:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce...
Read More