Medical research

In this Nov. 22, 2019, photo, Charles Flagg, who is stricken with Alzheimer's disease, receives the contents of an intravenous bag while participating in a study on the drug Aducanumab at Butler Hospital in Providence, R.I. New results were released on the experimental medicine whose maker claims it can slow the decline of Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
December 05, 2019 - 11:40 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A company that claims to have the first drug to slow mental decline from Alzheimer's disease made its case to scientists Thursday, disclosing more results that may help explain why one study of the experimental medicine succeeded and another failed. Excitement and skepticism have...
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This undated photo provided by Acadia Pharmaceuticals Inc. shows a bottle of Nuplazid, a drug that was tested for treating psychosis related to dementia. If regulators agree, the drug could become the first treatment specifically for dementia-related psychosis and the first new medicine for Alzheimer's in nearly two decades. Results from a study on the drug were disclosed Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019, at an Alzheimer's conference in San Diego. (Acadia Pharmaceuticals Inc. via AP)
December 04, 2019 - 7:53 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A drug that curbs delusions in Parkinson's patients did the same for people with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia in a study that was stopped early because the benefit seemed clear. If regulators agree, the drug could become the first treatment specifically for...
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November 22, 2019 - 8:02 am
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said Friday his administration will spend $3 million on a pair of studies to explore the potential health impacts of the natural gas industry, taking action after months of impassioned pleas by the families of pediatric cancer patients who live in the most heavily drilled...
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In this Feb. 16, 2017 file photo, surgeons perform a non-emergency angioplasty at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Through a blood vessel in the groin, a tube is guided to a blockage in the heart. A tiny balloon is then inflated to flatten the clog, and a mesh tube called a stent is inserted to prop the artery open. According to a federally funded study released on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019, people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
November 16, 2019 - 1:01 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A large study finds that people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2019 file photo people walk at the University Village area of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. USC is among three universities and a health care institution who are sharing a gift of more than $1 billion that’s one of the largest in the history of higher education. The $260 million apiece gifts announced Wednesday, Nov. 13 come from this year’s sale of the Lord Corp. to Parker-Hannifin Corp. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
November 13, 2019 - 10:45 am
Three universities and a health care institution are sharing a gift of more than $1 billion that’s one of the largest in the history of higher education, they announced Wednesday. Receiving $260 million apiece will be Duke University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of...
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November 12, 2019 - 4:40 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Billionaire philanthropists Joan and Sandy Weill announced Tuesday they are donating $106 million to launch a research initiative at three West Coast universities aimed at finding treatments for brain disorders like epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. The donation to the...
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FILE - This June 14, 2011, file photo, shows the pills of the drug Lipitor in Willingboro, N.J. Researchers examined records of people taking cholesterol-lowering medicine between 2005 and 2016, a few years after a big change in treatment guidelines. They found encouraging drops, suggesting the change may be paying off. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
November 11, 2019 - 1:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Here's some good health news: Cholesterol levels are dropping in the U.S. Researchers examined records of people taking cholesterol-lowering medicine between 2005 and 2016, a few years after a big change in treatment guidelines. They found encouraging declines, suggesting the...
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November 04, 2019 - 4:54 am
Office workers bemoan driving home in the dark. Night owls relish the chance to sleep in. As clocks tick toward the end of daylight saving time, many sleep scientists and circadian biologists are pushing for a permanent ban because of potential ill effects on human health. Losing an hour of...
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October 28, 2019 - 5:55 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A retired FBI agent described a horrific raid of now-closed body donation facility Monday, recalling a table stacked with severed human legs, heads stuffed in a cooler, and torsos without heads and limbs. Mark Cwynar testified on the opening day of a civil trial that one torso had...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019, file image taken with a slow shutter speed a soccer player runs for the ball during the Euro 2020 group A qualifying soccer match in Prague, Czech Republic. A study, from the University of Glasgow and reported Monday, Oct. 21, in New England Journal of Medicine, of former professional soccer players in Scotland found that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:53 am
LONDON (AP) — A study of former professional soccer players in Scotland finds that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. The results raise fresh concerns about head-related risks from...
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