Medical research

A firefighter walks near the entrance to NuStar Energy fuel storage facility Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019 after a Tuesday fire in Crockett, Calif. Officials were trying to determine Wednesday if a 4.5 magnitude earthquake triggered an explosion at a fuel storage facility in the San Francisco Bay Area that started a fire and trapped thousands in their homes for hours because of potentially unhealthy air. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
October 16, 2019 - 7:20 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Officials were trying to determine Wednesday if a 4.5 magnitude earthquake triggered an explosion at a fuel storage facility in the San Francisco Bay Area that started a fire and kept thousands of people in their homes for hours because of potentially unhealthy air. The...
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Leslie Begay, left, speaks with U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-New Mexico, in a hallway outside a congressional field hearing in Albuquerque, N.M., highlighting the atomic age's impact on Native American communities on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. Begay, a former uranium miner on the Navajo Nation with lung problems, says there are lingering injustices and health problems on his reservation decades after mines closed. An Indian Health Service official cited federal research at the hearing that she says showed some Navajo women, males and babies who were part of the study had high levels of uranium in their systems. (AP Photo/Mary Hudetz)
October 07, 2019 - 9:30 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — About a quarter of Navajo women and some infants who were part of a federally funded study on uranium exposure had high levels of the radioactive metal in their systems, decades after mining for Cold War weaponry ended on their reservation, a U.S. health official Monday...
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This undated photo provided by Johns Hopkins University shows Gregg L. Semenza at the university in Baltimore. Semenza, a Johns Hopkins University researcher, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. He will share the prize with Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. and Peter J. Ratcliffe for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability, the Nobel Committee announced Monday. (Johns Hopkins University via AP)
October 07, 2019 - 7:48 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (all times local): 2:40 p.m. Dr. Gregg Semenza, a top researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, says he was awakened by a call from Stockholm shortly before 4 a.m. with the good news that he is one of three...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, a doctor performs an ultrasound scan on a pregnant woman at a hospital in Chicago. A new study released Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. During pregnancy, particle pollution is linked to premature births and low birth weight, but scientists don’t understand why. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford, File)
September 17, 2019 - 10:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. Pollution composed of tiny particles from car exhaust, factory smokestacks and other sources is dangerous to everyone's health, and during...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2010 file photo Mercedes Grand Prix driver Michael Schumacher of Germany is pictured in the pits during the first practice session at the Formula One Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir, Bahrain. A Paris newspaper says seven-time Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher is being treated with a cutting-edge stem-cell therapy in one of the French capital's hospitals. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
September 10, 2019 - 2:59 am
PARIS (AP) — Seven-time Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher has been admitted under great secrecy to a Paris hospital to be treated Tuesday with a cutting-edge stem-cell therapy, according to a French newspaper. The Paris hospitals authority, citing France's strict medical privacy rules,...
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September 08, 2019 - 10:08 pm
BOSTON (AP) — U.S. Sens. Edward Markey and Elizabeth Warren are pressing federal health officials on research efforts to combat eastern equine encephalitis. The two Massachusetts Democrats this week sent a letter to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases within the National...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 15, 2015 file photo, a lesbian couple holds hands in Salt Lake City. Released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, the largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, echoing research that says there is no single “gay gene.” (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
August 29, 2019 - 1:41 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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File-In this July 13, 2019 file photo, health workers wearing protective gear check on a patient isolated in a plastic cube at an Ebola treatment center in Beni, Congo. Health authorities in Congo have halted an Ebola treatment study early with good news: Two of the four experimental drugs seem to be saving lives. More than 1,800 people have died in the African country’s yearlong outbreak. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
August 12, 2019 - 1:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Two of four experimental Ebola drugs being tested in Congo seem to be saving lives, international health authorities announced Monday. The preliminary findings prompted an early halt to a major study on the drugs and a decision to prioritize their use in the African country, where...
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August 02, 2019 - 7:08 am
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Researchers in Uganda are launching the largest-ever trial of an experimental Ebola vaccine that is expected to be deployed in neighboring Congo, where a deadly outbreak has killed over 1,800 people. The trial of the Janssen Pharmaceuticals vaccine involves up to 800 people...
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This image provided by the American Medical Association in July 2019 shows the amount of differences between brain scans of patients, U.S. diplomats who developed concussion-like symptoms after working in Cuba, and a control group. Between late 2016 and May 2018, several U.S. and Canadian diplomats in Havana complained of health problems from an unknown cause. One U.S. government count put the number of American personnel affected at 26. (American Medical Association via AP)
July 23, 2019 - 6:16 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Advanced brain scans found perplexing differences in U.S. diplomats who say they developed concussion-like symptoms after working in Cuba, a finding that only heightens the mystery of what may have happened to them, a new study says. Extensive imaging tests showed the workers had...
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