Military legal affairs

FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2017 file photo, National Security Adviser Michael Flynn speaks during the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington. The special counsel in the Russia investigation is set to give the first public insight into how much valuable information President Donald Trump's former national security adviser has shared with prosecutors. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
December 04, 2018 - 7:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former national security adviser Michael Flynn (all times local): 8:40 p.m. The special counsel's office is calling Michael Flynn's cooperation "substantial" and is recommending no prison time for the former Trump administration national security adviser. Prosecutors...
Read More
December 03, 2018 - 10:04 am
LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Portuguese lawmakers trying to figure out who should be blamed for last year's major theft of weapons from the national armory want to question the prime minister, the current and former army chiefs of staff and a former attorney general. Senior members of the police and...
Read More
A woman from El Salvador waits to see whether the majority of migrants decide to move, as Central Americans debate individually whether to accept the city's plan to move them to a new shelter from the Benito Juarez sports complex, in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. Authorities in the Mexican city of Tijuana have begun moving some of more than 6,000 Central American migrants from an overcrowded shelter on the border to an events hall further away.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
November 30, 2018 - 8:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump administration officials vowed Friday to address some of issues that forced them to decide against criminally prosecuting any of the 42 members of a Central American migrant caravan arrested last weekend who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally during a chaotic clash...
Read More
November 29, 2018 - 6:14 pm
SHREVEPORT, La. (AP) — A federal judge has ordered $34.8 million in restitution from a former owner of a company that committed what one prosecutor calls the nation's worst-ever dumping of military explosives. The case arose from a huge munitions blast in 2012. David Alan Smith of Winchester,...
Read More
A Ukrainian sailor, right, is escorted by a Russian intelligence agency FSB officer to a court room in Simferopol, Crimea, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. The Russians seized the ships and their crews, who are expected to face a court hearing later Tuesday in the Crimean capital of Simferopol. (AP Photo)
November 27, 2018 - 2:30 pm
KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia on Tuesday began prosecuting the crew of Ukrainian navy vessels captured over the weekend in a confrontation off Crimea, putting some of the seamen on camera, where they confessed to intruding into Russian waters. Ukraine demanded that Russia stop using "psychological...
Read More
FILE - In this July 26, 2017, file photo, a supporter of LGBT rights holds up an "equality flag" on Capitol Hill in Washington, during an event held by Rep. Joe Kennedy, D-Mass. in support of transgender members of the military. The Trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to fast-track cases on the president's decision to prevent certain transgender people from serving in the military. The administration asked the court on Nov. 23, 2018, to take up three cases on the issue. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
November 24, 2018 - 5:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration asked the Supreme Court to issue an unusually quick ruling on the Pentagon's policy of restricting military service by transgender people. It's the fourth time in recent months the administration has sought to bypass lower courts that have blocked some of...
Read More
FILE - In this July 26, 2017, file photo, a supporter of LGBT rights holds up an "equality flag" on Capitol Hill in Washington, during an event held by Rep. Joe Kennedy, D-Mass. in support of transgender members of the military. The Trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to fast-track cases on the president's decision to prevent certain transgender people from serving in the military. The administration asked the court on Nov. 23, 2018, to take up three cases on the issue. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
November 23, 2018 - 4:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration asked the Supreme Court on Friday to issue an unusually quick ruling on the Pentagon's policy of restricting military service by transgender people. It's the fourth time in recent months the administration has sought to bypass lower courts that have...
Read More
In this Nov. 14, 2018 photo, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and Homeland Security Secretary Kirsten Nielsen, third from the right, visit Base Camp Donna, in Donna, Texas. Mattis says the White House has given him the authority to use military troops to protect Customs and Border Protection personnel at the southwest border. This could, under certain circumstances, mean directing troops to temporarily detain migrants in the event of disorder or violence against border patrol agents. (Joel Martinez/The Monitor via AP)/The Monitor via AP)
November 21, 2018 - 2:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Wednesday the White House has given him explicit authority to use military troops to protect Customs and Border Protection personnel, with lethal force if necessary, at the southwest border. This could, under certain circumstances, mean...
Read More
November 17, 2018 - 4:59 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Britain's Home Office says that the company contracted to collect visa applications in Russia has "absolutely no involvement with the decision-making process." The company, TLSContact, is "simply an application point," according to a statement. Final decisions are made in the U.K. The...
Read More
FILE - In this July 12, 2018 file photo, Navy Secretary Richard Spencer delivers a speech during a re-dedication ceremony for the USS John S. McCain at the U.S. Naval base in Yokosuka, southwest of Tokyo. Thousands of Navy and Marine Corps veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan who developed post-traumatic stress disorder but were denied Veterans Affairs health benefits have been given a green light to sue the military, under a ruling by a federal judge in Connecticut. Senior U.S. District Judge Charles Haight Jr. in New Haven on Thursday, Nov. 15, certified a class-action lawsuit against Spencer by veterans who say they were unfairly given less-than-honorable discharges for minor infractions linked to their untreated mental health problems. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
November 16, 2018 - 11:29 am
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Thousands of Navy and Marine Corps veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan who developed post-traumatic stress disorder but were denied Veterans Affairs health benefits have been given a green light to sue the military, under a ruling by a federal judge in Connecticut. Senior U.S...
Read More

Pages