Monopoly and antitrust

FILE- In this Jan. 9, 2019, file photo a sign advertises 5G at the Qualcomm booth at CES International in Las Vegas. Qualcomm and Apple drove declines in technology stocks on Wednesday, May 22. Qualcomm plunged following a federal judge's ruling against the chipmaker in an antitrust case. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
May 22, 2019 - 10:19 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that Qualcomm unlawfully squeezed out cellphone chip rivals and charged excessive royalties to manufacturers such as Apple in a decision that undercuts a key part of its business. The decision vindicates the U.S. Federal Trade Commission two years after it...
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FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2018 file photo, attendees look at the latest technology from Qualcomm at the China International Import Expo in Shanghai. Qualcomm’s stock is tumbling before Wednesday’s market open on May 22, 2019, after a federal judge ruled that the company unlawfully stifled cellphone chip market competition and charged excessive licensing fees. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
May 22, 2019 - 10:17 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on federal judge's ruling against Qualcomm (all times local): 11:15 a.m. A federal ruling against Qualcomm is likely to reduce the licensing fees paid on the sales of smartphones. But it's unclear if device makers such as Apple will pass on any of their savings and lower...
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FILE- In this May 31, 2018, file photo customers enter the Apple store in New York. The Supreme Court is allowing consumers to pursue an antitrust lawsuit that claims Apple has unfairly monopolized the market for the sale of iPhone apps. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
May 13, 2019 - 3:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers can pursue a lawsuit complaining that iPhone apps cost too much, the Supreme Court ruled on Monday, adding to Apple's woes that already include falling iPhone sales and a European investigation. The lawsuit could have major implications for the tech giant's handling of...
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A power plant steams behind steel works of German steelmaker Thyssenkrupp in Duisburg, Germany, Thursday, May 9, 2019. Steelmaking giant Thyssenkrupp of Germany says it expects European antitrust regulators to block its plan to combine its European operations with India's Tata Steel. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
May 10, 2019 - 7:41 am
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German steelmaker Thyssenkrupp said Friday it would cut some 6,000 jobs and restructure its businesses after saying that it expects European antitrust regulators to block plans for a joint venture with India's Tata Steel. CEO Guido Kerkhoff said 4,000 of the lost jobs...
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FILE-In this March 21, 2018 file photo shows the logo of German car manufacturer BMW visible at the headquarters in Munich, Germany. German automaker BMW said Tuesday that its first quarter profit sagged by 74 percent as earnings were hit by a 1.4 billion-euro ($1.6 billion) set-aside for an anti-trust fine from the European Commission and by higher up-front costs for new technology and factories.(AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)
May 07, 2019 - 4:14 am
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — BMW lost money making cars in the first quarter as its automotive division was hit by a 1.4 billion-euro ($1.6 billion) set-aside for an anti-trust fine from the European Commission and by higher up-front costs for new technology and factories. The fine and investment...
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Cars are seen during an opening ceremony of the Mercedes Benz automobile assembly plant outside Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, April 3, 2019. Germany's Daimler AG has opened a new Mercedes factory in Russia, part of a 250 million euro ($281 million) investment it says will create 1,000 jobs. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, Pool)
April 05, 2019 - 9:11 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union authorities said Friday that German automakers BMW, Daimler and Volkswagen colluded to limit the development of emissions-cleaning technology in cars. The finding adds to the car industry's woes after Volkswagen in 2015 admitted to cheating on emissions tests in the U...
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FILE - In this March 29, 2018, file photo, NCAA President Mark Emmert speaks during a news conference in San Antonio. Emmert says a judge’s recent ruling in a federal antitrust lawsuit again reinforced that college athletes should be treated as students not employees. Emmert spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday, April 3, at U.S. Bank Stadium, the site of the men’s basketball Final Four, making his first public comments since last month’s decision. Judge Claudia Wilken ruled the NCAA did violate antitrust laws and cannot prohibit schools from providing more benefits to athletes as long as they are tethered to education. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
April 04, 2019 - 2:06 am
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — NCAA President Mark Emmert says a judge's recent ruling in a federal antitrust lawsuit again reinforced that college athletes should be treated as students not employees. Emmert spoke to The Associated Press on Wednesday at U.S. Bank Stadium, the site of the men's basketball...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks at the Heartland Forum held on the campus of Buena Vista University in Storm Lake, Iowa, Saturday, March 30, 2019. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 30, 2019 - 6:32 pm
STORM LAKE, Iowa (AP) — Democratic presidential contenders Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar expressed support Saturday for strengthening antitrust laws and enforcement to break up big agriculture monopolies. "You've got these giant corporations that are making bigger and bigger profits ... and...
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March 23, 2019 - 9:29 am
The NCAA and major college conferences will appeal a judge's ruling that the governing body violates antitrust laws by limiting education-related benefits to athletes. In a statement released early Saturday, NCAA chief legal officer Donald Remy said the district court "erred by giving itself...
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European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager speaks during a media conference at EU headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. European Union regulators have hit Google with a 1.49 billion euro ($1.68 billion) fine for abusing its dominant role in online advertising. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
March 20, 2019 - 3:19 pm
BRUSSELS (AP) — Europe's antitrust regulators slapped Google with a big fine Wednesday for the third time in less than two years, ordering the tech giant to pay 1.49 billion euros ($1.7 billion) for freezing out rivals in the online advertising business. The ruling brings to nearly $10 billion the...
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