Pet health

In this April 2, 2020 photo provided by Rachael Pavlik, the Pavlik family, Matthew, Rachael, their son Henry, hedgehog Quillie Nelson and German shorthair pointer Mudge, poses for a photo in their home in Sugar Land, Texas. Many pet owners are taking comfort in their animals as they shelter at home amid the coronavirus pandemic. ( (Rachael Pavlik via AP)
April 08, 2020 - 9:57 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Lala, a 3-month-old black Lab, romped into Ufuoma George’s life a few weeks ago, just as she retreated into her New York apartment in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Lala, she thought, would be company. But she’s turned out to be so much more. “Being alone at home kind of is...
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This undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society shows Nadia, a Malayan tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York. Nadia has tested positive for the new coronavirus, in what is believed to be the first known infection in an animal in the U.S. or a tiger anywhere, federal officials and the zoo said Sunday, April 5, 2020. (Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society via AP)
April 05, 2020 - 6:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A tiger at the Bronx Zoo has tested positive for the new coronavirus, in what is believed to be the first known infection in an animal in the U.S. or a tiger anywhere, federal officials and the zoo said Sunday. The 4-year-old Malayan tiger named Nadia — and six other tigers and...
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In this March 27, 2020 photo, Kim Simeon and children Annabel, 9, and Brennan, 11, pose for a photo with Nala, a dog they are fostering, in Omaha, Neb. The Simeon family was headed home to Omaha from a much-needed Smoky Mountains vacation when Kim Simeon spotted a social media post from the Nebraska Humane Society, pleading with people to consider fostering a pet. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
April 04, 2020 - 8:13 am
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The Simeon family was heading home to Omaha from a Smoky Mountains vacation when Kim Simeon spotted a social media post from the Nebraska Humane Society, pleading with people to consider fostering a pet amid concerns about how the coronavirus would affect operations. A day later...
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FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2020, file photo, a resident wearing mask walks her dogs in Beijing. Pet cats and dogs cannot pass the new coronavirus on to humans, but they can test positive for low levels of the pathogen if they catch it from their owners. That's the conclusion of Hong Kong's Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department after a dog in quarantine tested weak positive for the virus Feb. 27, Feb. 28 and March 2, using the canine's nasal and oral cavity samples. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
KNSS News
March 05, 2020 - 1:36 am
HONG KONG (AP) — Pet cats and dogs cannot pass the new coronavirus on to humans, but they can test positive for low levels of the pathogen if they catch it from their owners. That's the conclusion of Hong Kong's Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department after a dog in quarantine tested...
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February 05, 2020 - 1:37 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A sick Hawaiian monk seal under the care of wildlife scientists is suffering from a parasitic infection often spread via feral cat feces, officials said. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials determined that the seal suffering from toxoplasmosis, the Honolulu...
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In this April 2016 photo provided by the United States Department of Agriculture, detector canine "Bello" works in a citrus orchard in Texas, searching for citrus greening disease, a bacteria that is spread by a tiny insect that feeds on citrus trees. (Gavin Poole/USDA via AP)
February 03, 2020 - 2:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dog detectives might be able to help save ailing citrus groves, research published Monday suggests. Scientists trained dogs to sniff out a crop disease called citrus greening that has hit orange, lemon and grapefruit orchards in Florida, California and Texas. The dogs can detect...
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In this Nov. 5, 2019 photo, in St. Francis, Wis., Amy Carter looks at her Yorkshire terrier-Chihuahua mix Bentley, who has epilepsy. Carter, gives him CBD, which she says has reduced his seizures. The federal government has yet to establish standards for CBD that will help pet owners know whether it works and how much to give. But the lack of regulation has not stopped some from buying it, fueling a $400 million CBD market for pets that grew more than tenfold since last year and is expected to reach $1.7 billion by 2023, according to the cannabis research firm Brightfield Group. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
January 07, 2020 - 10:16 am
Companies have unleashed hundreds of CBD pet health products accompanied by glowing customer testimonials claiming the cannabis derivative produced calmer, quieter and pain-free dogs and cats. But some of these products are all bark and no bite. “You'd be astounded by the analysis we've seen of...
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September 27, 2019 - 10:29 pm
DENVER (AP) — Duane Chapman, known to millions as the star of the "Dog the Bounty Hunter" reality TV show, tells People magazine that he is facing his own medical problems after the death of his wife from cancer. Chapman, 66, appeared on Monday's episode of "The Dr. Oz Show" in which he learned...
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September 07, 2019 - 8:11 am
HELSINKI (AP) — Norwegian authorities haven't been able to detect the cause behind an unexplained disease that is estimated to have killed dozens of dogs in the country in recent days, officials said Saturday. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority said that it had been informed of another six cases...
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FILE - In this May 25, 2000 file photo, Desert Bighorn Sheep eat and rest in the Condor Ridge exhibit at the San Diego Wild Animal Park. A new survey has found a sharp decline in desert bighorn sheep in Southern California, and biologists suspect the cause is a disease contracted from domestic animals. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife says a survey in early March 2019 counted 60 bighorns in the Mount San Gorgonio region east of Los Angeles. That's down two-thirds from a survey conducted in 2016. (AP Photo/Bob Grieser, File)
March 15, 2019 - 5:53 pm
RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — A new survey has found a sharp decline in desert bighorn sheep in Southern California, and biologists suspect the cause is a disease contracted from domestic animals. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife says a survey earlier this month counted 60 bighorns in the...
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