Public opinion

FILE - In this Nov. 14, 2019, file photo, a woman checks her phone in Orem, Utah. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and USAFacts finds that Americans are getting information about government from social media at least as much as from traditional news sources, but few trust what they see and read. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
November 26, 2019 - 8:02 am
PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island (AP) — It's one of America's leading sources for news about the government, yet also among the least trusted. Social media, a new poll finds, is America's political news paradox. Julie Ferguson, an occupational therapist in central Washington state, remembers getting TV...
Read More
President Donald Trump talks with reporters during a visit by Conan, the U.S. Army dog that participated in the raid that killed ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, Nov. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
November 26, 2019 - 5:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The witnesses have spoken, the politics are largely settled. Now impeachment investigators will make the case for public opinion. On Monday, hundreds of pages from Democratic Chairman Adam Schiff’s intelligence committee were being compiled into an exhaustive report that will...
Read More
President Donald Trump walks with Bulgarian Prime Minister Boyko Borissov to the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, Nov. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
November 25, 2019 - 9:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The witnesses have spoken, the politics are largely settled. Now impeachment investigators will make the case for public opinion. On Monday, hundreds of pages from Democratic Chairman Adam Schiff’s intelligence committee were being compiled into an exhaustive report that will...
Read More
Iwao Hakamada, who converted to Catholicism during his decades on death row, speaks during a press conference after attending the Mass held by Pope Francis at the Tokyo Dome Monday, Nov. 25, 2019, in Tokyo. A former Japanese professional boxer who spent 48 years in prison for murders he says he did not commit was among some 50,000 people greeting Pope Francis as he entered Tokyo Dome stadium to celebrate Mass on Monday. (Kyodo News via AP)/Kyodo News via AP)
KNSS News
November 25, 2019 - 6:42 am
TOKYO (AP) — A former Japanese professional boxer who spent 48 years in prison for murders he says he did not commit was among some 50,000 people greeting Pope Francis as he entered Tokyo Dome stadium to celebrate Mass on Monday. Iwao Hakamada, who converted to Catholicism during his decades on...
Read More
Romanian President Klaus Iohannis speaks to the media after casting his vote in Bucharest, Romania, Sunday, Nov. 24, 2019. Romanians are voting in a presidential runoff election in which incumbent Klaus Iohannis is vying for a second term, facing Social Democratic Party leader Viorica Dancila, a former prime minister, in Sunday's vote. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
November 24, 2019 - 1:37 pm
BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — An exit poll published in Romania on Sunday after the close of voting stations shows incumbent Klaus Iohannis easily winning a second term in Romania’s presidential election. Iohannis, a conservative, was facing Social Democratic Party leader Viorica Dancila, a former...
Read More
Supporters of a pro-democracy candidate cheer after winning their seat in district council elections in Hong Kong, early Monday, Nov. 25, 2019. Voters in Hong Kong turned out in droves on Sunday in district council elections seen as a barometer of public support for pro-democracy protests that have rocked the semi-autonomous Chinese territory for more than five months. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
November 24, 2019 - 12:05 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Vote counting was underway in Hong Kong early Monday after a massive turnout in district council elections seen as a barometer of public support for pro-democracy protests that have rocked the semi-autonomous Chinese territory for more than five months. The Electoral Affairs...
Read More
In this photo taken Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, district council candidate Cathy Yau walks during her campaign at Causeway Bay in Hong Kong. Yau. a former police officer, grew exasperated as police used more force to quell the unrest. She quit the force in July after 11 years and is running in Sunday's district polls that are widely expected to deliver a decisive victory for the six-month-old movement seeking democratic reforms in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
November 22, 2019 - 6:56 am
HONG KONG (AP) — Cathy Yau remembers the first time she was called a “dirty cop” by Hong Kong’s anti-government protesters, days after police deployed tear gas to repel tens of thousands of black-clad demonstrators blocking the legislature. The former officer, exasperated at the increasing use of...
Read More
Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards arrives to address supporters at his election night watch party in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
November 17, 2019 - 7:44 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Odd-year elections in Louisiana, Kentucky and Virginia have let Democrats expand their footprint in Southern states where Republicans dominated not long ago. Those outcomes hardly predict national 2020 results: President Donald Trump isn’t suddenly at risk of losing...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2009 file photo, a pressman pulls a copy of one of the final editions of the Rocky Mountain News off the press in the Washington Street Printing Plant of the Denver Newspaper Agency in Denver. A survey by Gallup and the Knight Foundation released on Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, finds Democrats much more willing than Republicans to see government funding help local news sources. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
November 17, 2019 - 12:38 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s partisan divide is evident when Americans are asked about what should be done to help the nation’s struggling local news industry. While two-thirds of Democrats say news organizations in need should be able to receive government or private funding in order to survive,...
Read More
In this Nov. 13, 2019, photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the East Room of the White House in Washington. In a sharply divided country, a new poll finds some things Americans can agree on. There’s widespread consensus on the importance of factual information being transparent and based in data, and Democrats and Republicans alike frequently find the current information environment challenging. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
November 14, 2019 - 7:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a sharply divided country, here's something many Americans agree on: It's hard to know what's a true and honest fact. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and USA Facts finds that regardless of political belief, many Americans say they...
Read More

Pages