Right to privacy

Olimpia Coral Melo, who became an activist against online sexual harassment and assault after a video of her having sex was published online in 2013, speaks during a live broadcast with Benito Juarez borough Mayor Santiago Taboada, in Mexico City, Monday, Nov. 23, 2020. Melo's story and subsequent activism have led to the creation of numerous state laws against cyber violence, and Mexico's government is on the verge of passing a federal version of "Olimpia's Law." (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
November 25, 2020 - 2:42 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Activist Olimpia Coral went through an inferno in 2013, when an ex-boyfriend posted sexual images that made the rounds in her conservative town in Mexico. Things got so bad — the shaming, the internet bullying — that she hid in the trunk of a taxi when going to her grandmother's...
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Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, center, and other doctors, walk out to talk with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 05, 2020 - 6:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president's treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient's condition. But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and...
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FILE - This Aug. 11, 2019, file photo an iPhone displays the apps for Facebook and Messenger in New Orleans. Proposition 24 on California's 2020 ballot seeks to expand California's consumer privacy law by tripling penalties for companies that break laws regarding the collection and sale of children's private information. It would also create a state agency to enforce consumer privacy protections. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)
October 03, 2020 - 10:30 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Fitbits on our wrists collect our health and fitness data; Apple promises privacy but lots of iPhone apps can still share our personal information; and who really knows what they’re agreeing to when a website asks, “Do You Accept All Cookies?” Most people just click “OK”...
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September 28, 2020 - 3:26 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A U.S. district judge has dismissed New Mexico’s privacy claims against Google over privacy concerns, but New Mexico's top prosecutor vowed Monday to continue the legal fight to protect child privacy rights. The judge concluded in a ruling Friday that federal laws and...
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FILE - In this Sept. 17, 2017, file photo, New Orleans Saints owner Tom Benson sits on the sideline with his wife, Gayle Benson, before an NFL football game in New Orleans. An Associated Press review of public tax documents found that the Bensons' foundation has given at least $62 million to the Archdiocese of New Orleans and other Catholic causes over the past dozen years, including gifts to schools, universities, charities and individual parishes. (AP Photo/Bill Feig, File)
July 15, 2020 - 11:07 am
A judge has denied a request by news organizations including The Associated Press to unseal court records involving the mental competency of billionaire Tom Benson when he rewrote his will to give his third wife ownership of the New Orleans Saints and Pelicans sports franchises. The news outlets...
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This aerial drone photo shows the Call Federal Credit Union building, front, Tuesday June 16, 2020, in Midlothian, Va. Police were able to obtain geofence search warrants, a tool being increasingly used by law enforcement. The warrant sought location histories kept by Google of cellphones and other devices used within 150 meters (500 feet) of the bank. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
July 03, 2020 - 11:17 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — It was a terrifying bank robbery: Demanding cash in a handwritten note, a man waved a gun, threatened to kill a teller's family, ordered employees and customers onto the floor and escaped with $195,000. Surveillance video gave authorities a lead, showing a man holding a...
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A soldier of the Swiss army wearing a protective face mask holds a smartphone with an app using Decentralized Privacy-Preserving Proximity Tracing (DP-3T) during a test with 100 soldiers in the military compound of Chamblon near Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland, Thursday, April 30, 2020. The race by governments to develop mobile tracing apps in order to contain infections after lockdowns ease is focusing attention on privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, where academics and civil liberties activists are pushing for solutions that protect personal data. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP)
May 04, 2020 - 5:56 am
LONDON (AP) — Goodbye lockdown, hello smartphone. As governments race to develop mobile tracing apps to help contain infections, attention is turning to how officials will ensure users’ privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, which has been one of the hardest-hit regions in the world,...
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A woman covers her face as she shops at a food market in Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, March 15, 2020. ‏Israel has imposed a number of tough restrictions to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that schools, universities, restaurants and places of entertainment will be closed to stop the spread of the coronavirus. He also encouraged people not to go to their workplaces unless absolutely necessary. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
March 15, 2020 - 5:44 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel has long been known for its use of technology to track the movements of Palestinian militants. Now, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wants to use similar technology to stop the movement of the coronavirus. Netanyahu’s Cabinet on Sunday authorized the Shin Bet security...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Wednesday, March 28, 2012, a security cctv camera is seen by the Olympic Stadium at the Olympic Park in London. The South Wales police deployed facial recognition surveillance equipment on Sunday Jan. 12, 2020, in a test to monitor crowds arriving for a weekend soccer match in real-time, that is prompting public debate about possible aggressive uses of facial recognition in Western democracies, raising questions about human rights and how the technology may enter people's daily lives in the future. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, FILE)
January 24, 2020 - 11:08 am
LONDON (AP) — London police will start using facial recognition cameras to pick out suspects from street crowds in real time, in a major advance for the controversial technology that raises worries about automated surveillance and erosion of privacy rights. The Metropolitan Police Service said...
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FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo California Attorney General Xavier Becerra gestures while speaking at a media conference in San Francisco. Forty million Californians will shortly obtain sweeping digital privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. “If we do this right in California," says Becerra, the state will "put the capital P back into privacy for all Americans.” (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
December 29, 2019 - 9:28 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Forty million Californians will soon have sweeping digital-privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. So long as state residents don't mind shouldering much of the burden of...
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