Rising sea levels

A man casts his ballot at a polling station in Hamburg, Germany, Sunday, Feb. 23. Hamburg, Germany's second-biggest city which is also one of Germany's 16 federal states elect a new regional assembly. (Daniel Reinhardt/dpa via AP)
February 23, 2020 - 2:41 am
BERLIN (AP) — Voters in Hamburg, Germany's second-biggest city, go to the polls Sunday to pick a new regional assembly in an election that's been dominated by the issue of climate change. The city state has been governed by a coalition of the center-left Social Democrats and the environmentalist...
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In this Jan. 11, 2020 photo a man photographs waves crashing onto the cliffs at Rodea Point in Lincoln County, Ore. during an extreme high tide that coincided with a big winter storm. Amateur scientists are whipping out their smartphones to document the effects of extreme high tides on shore lines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels due to climate change will mean for coastal communities around the world. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
February 05, 2020 - 12:09 am
DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — Tourists, nature lovers and amateur scientists are whipping out their cameras to document the effects of extreme high tides on shorelines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels will mean for coastal communities...
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People gather trash on the beach for the Huddle for 100 beach clean up at the Historic Virginia Key Beach Park on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020, in Miami. Climate change poses a threat to South Florida's way of life, including Miami's customary spot in the NFL's Super Bowl rotation. The game will be played Sunday in Miami for the 11th time, the most of any city. But the sea and temperature are rising, which could eventually make South Florida an unsuitable Super Bowl site. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
January 31, 2020 - 1:17 pm
MIAMI (AP) — The forecast for the Super Bowl in Miami is grim. Clear skies and temperature in the 60s are expected when the game kicks off, so weather won't be a problem. But climate change likely will be, sooner or later. The sea and temperature are rising, posing a threat to South Floridians' way...
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A flood-plain forest grows now where there used to be houses in the Watson Crampton neighborhood in Woodbridge, N.J., as seen from the air on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. The Heards Brook on the top meets the Woodbridge River on the left, which leads to the Atlantic Ocean. Homeowners here took buyouts through a program that purchases houses and demolishes them to remove people from danger and to help absorb water from rising sea levels due to climate change. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)
December 23, 2019 - 1:22 am
WOODBRIDGE, N.J. (AP) — Housing is in high demand in the heavily populated northeastern United States. But in Woodbridge, New Jersey, the state has bought and torn down 145 homes since 2013 and returned the land to nature, with eight homes demolished this month alone. Dozens more are slated to be...
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Thousands of demonstrators attend a protest climate strike ralley of the 'Friday For Future Movement' in Leipzig, Germany, Friday, Nov. 29, 2019. Cities all over the world have strikes and demonstrations for the climate during this ClimateActionDay. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
November 29, 2019 - 12:00 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Protesters in cities across the world staged rallies Friday demanding leaders take tougher action against climate change, days before the latest global conference, which this year takes place in Madrid. The rallies kicked off in Australia, where people affected by recent devastating...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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People wade through water in a flooded St. Mark's Square in Venice, Italy, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. The high-water mark hit 187 centimeters (74 inches) late Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, meaning more than 85% of the city was flooded. The highest level ever recorded was 194 centimeters (76 inches) during infamous flooding in 1966. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 13, 2019 - 1:24 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The worst flooding in Venice in more than 50 years prompted calls Wednesday to better protect the historic city from rising sea levels as officials calculated hundreds of millions of euros in damage. The water reached 1.87 meters (6.14 feet) above average sea level Tuesday, the...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
October 29, 2019 - 11:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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FILE - In this Saturday, April 13, 2019 file photo, Seychelles President Danny Faure sits inside a submersible on the deck of vessel Ocean Zephyr, off the coast of Desroches, in the outer islands of Seychelles. Faure warns there's no time for the "blame Game" in the fight against climate change and urges major nations to do more adding that the small island nations, like his, are the least responsible for the problem but the most in danger as sea levels rise (AP Photo/Steve Barker, file)
October 29, 2019 - 5:14 am
LONDON (AP) — The Seychelles president is warning there's no time for a "blame game" in the fight against climate change and he urges major nations to do more. President Danny Faure in an exclusive interview with The Associated Press says small island nations like his are the least responsible for...
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FILE - This early Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 file photo shows an aerial view of large Icebergs floating as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade, and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. A special United Nations-affiliated oceans and ice report released on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2019 projects three feet of rising seas by the end of the century, much fewer fish, weakening ocean currents, even less snow and ice, and nastier hurricanes, caused by climate change. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
September 25, 2019 - 11:21 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Earth is in more hot water than ever before, and so are we, an expert United Nations climate panel warned in a grim new report Wednesday. Sea levels are rising at an ever-faster rate as ice and snow shrink, and oceans are getting more acidic and losing oxygen, the Intergovernmental...
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