science

FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020 file photo, provided by the Arecibo Observatory, shows the damage done by a broken cable that supported a metal platform, creating a 100-foot (30-meter) gash to the radio telescope's reflector dish in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Giant, aging cables that support the radio telescopes are slowly unraveling in this U.S. territory, threatening scientific projects that researchers say can’t be done elsewhere on the planet. (Arecibo Observatory via AP)
KNSS News
November 19, 2020 - 12:33 pm
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — The National Science Foundation announced Thursday that it will close the huge telescope at the renowned Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico in a blow to scientists worldwide who depend on it to search for planets, asteroids and extraterrestrial life. The independent,...
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Winners of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for 2020 at a press conference in Stockholm, Monday Oct. 12, 2020. Americans Paul R. Milgrom, left, and Robert B. Wilson have won the Nobel Prize in economics for "improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats." (Anders Wiklund/TT via AP)
KNSS News
October 12, 2020 - 10:17 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Two American economists won the Nobel Prize on Monday for improving how auctions work, research that underlies much of today’s economy — from the way Google sells advertising to the way telecoms companies acquire airwaves from the government. The discoveries of Paul R. Milgrom and...
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File---File picture taken Aug.3, 2020 shows teacher Francie Keller welcoming the pupils of class 3c in her classroom in the Lankow primary school to the first school day after the summer holidays in Schwerin, Germany. 2020. As Germany’s 16 states start sending millions of children back to school in the middle of the global coronavirus pandemic, those used to the country’s famous “Ordnung” are instead looking at uncertainty, with a hodgepodge of regional regulations that officials acknowledge may or may not work. (Jens Buettner/dpa via AP, File)
KNSS News
August 09, 2020 - 7:10 am
BERLIN (AP) — Masks during class, masks only in the halls, no masks at all. Distance when possible, no distance within same-grade groups, no distance at all. As Germany’s 16 states start sending millions of children back to school in the middle of the global coronavirus pandemic, the country’s...
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In this April 22, 2020 photo provided by New York Blood Center Enterprises, Aubrie Cresswell, 24, donates convalescent plasma at the Blood Bank of Delmarva Christiana Donor Center in suburban Newark, Del. “It’s, I think, our job as humans to step forward and help in society,” said Cresswell who has donated three times and counting. One donation was shipped to a hospitalized friend of a friend, and “it brought me to tears. I was like, overwhelmed with it just because the family was really thankful.” (New York Blood Center Enterprises via AP)
KNSS News
June 12, 2020 - 12:05 am
Survivors of COVID-19 are donating their blood plasma in droves in hopes it helps other patients recover from the coronavirus. And while the jury’s still out, now scientists are testing if the donations might also prevent infection in the first place. Thousands of coronavirus patients in hospitals...
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FILE - In this March 16, 2020, file photo, Neal Browning receives a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. The first experimental COVID-19 vaccine in the U.S. is on track to begin a huge study next month to prove if it really can fend off the coronavirus, its manufacturer announced Thursday, June 11 -- a long-awaited step in the global vaccine race. The vaccine, developed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., will be tested in 30,000 volunteers -- some given the real shot and some a dummy shot. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
KNSS News
June 11, 2020 - 1:16 pm
The first experimental COVID-19 vaccine in the U.S. is on track to begin a huge study next month to prove if it really can fend off the coronavirus, while hard-hit Brazil is testing a different shot from China. Where to do crucial, late-stage testing and how many volunteers are needed to roll up...
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In this April 2014 photo provided by the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre at the University of Saskatchewan, a researcher holds a ferret at their facility in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. In 2020, the lab is working with 300 ferrets developing a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine candidate and testing other vaccine candidates and therapeutics. (VIDO-InterVac at the University of Saskatchewan via AP)
KNSS News
June 02, 2020 - 4:29 am
The global race for a COVID-19 vaccine boils down to some critical questions: How much must the shots rev up someone’s immune system to really work? And could revving it the wrong way cause harm? Even as companies recruit tens of thousands of people for larger vaccine studies this summer, behind...
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In this Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a dead Asian giant hornet is photographed in a lab in Olympia, Wash. The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the "Murder Hornet" by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Quinlyn Baine/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
KNSS News
May 04, 2020 - 9:21 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch killer dubbed the "Murder Hornet" with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state, where entomologists were making plans to wipe it out. The giant Asian insect, with a sting that could be fatal to some people, is just...
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FILE - This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. The sample was isolated from a patient in the U.S. On Tuesday, April 21, 2020, U.S. health regulators OK'd the first coronavirus test that allows people to collect their own sample at home, a new approach that could help expand testing options in most states. The sample will still have to be shipped for processing back to LabCorp, which operates diagnostic labs throughout the U.S. (NIAID-RML via AP)
KNSS News
April 21, 2020 - 4:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Tuesday OK'd the first coronavirus test that allows people to collect their own sample at home, a new approach that could help expand testing options in most states. The test from LabCorp will initially only be available to health care workers and first...
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In this Monday, March 30, 2020 photo provided by Mount Sinai, from left, Drew Copeland, RPSGT; Dr. Thomas Tolbert, Dr. Brian Mayrsohn, and Dr. Hooman Poor, stand with a ventilator prototype they developed from a sleep apnea machine at Mount Sinai hospital in New York. (Mount Sinai via AP)
KNSS News
April 11, 2020 - 8:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The woman was dying. New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital was about to call her husband and break the news that there was nothing left to try. Then Dr. Hooman Poor took a gamble. With high-stress, high-stakes decisions, doctors around the world are frantically trying to figure out how...
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FILE - In this March 15, 2020, file photo, former Vice President Joe Biden prepares for a Democratic presidential primary debate with Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at CNN Studios in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
KNSS News
April 09, 2020 - 5:22 am
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that are being talked about today: 1. STAGE IS SET FOR NOVEMBER A general election campaign between Donald Trump and Joe Biden will almost certainly be the most expensive and among the nastiest in U.S. history. 2. ‘HOUSTON, WE’...
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