Scientific publishing

FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
December 01, 2019 - 12:50 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
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FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 file photo, beds are set up inside a mobile emergency room outside a hospital in Georgia. According to a new study published in the journal Science on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019, a widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
October 25, 2019 - 4:51 pm
A widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias that leads to blacks getting passed over for special care, according to a new study. The software predicts costs rather than sickness. It is used by U.S. insurers and hospitals to...
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This image provided by HHMI Tangled Bank Studios in October 2019 shows a rendering of the ancient Carsioptychus mammal taken from the PBS NOVA special, Rise of the Mammals. In this recreation, Carsioptychus coarctatus eats plants in a newly diversified forest, 300,000 years after the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs. (Jellyfish Pictures/HHMI Tangled Bank Studios via AP)
KNSS News
October 24, 2019 - 3:45 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A remarkable trove of fossils from Colorado has revealed details of how mammals grew larger and plants evolved after the cataclysm that killed the dinosaurs. The thousands of specimens let scientists trace that history over a span of 1 million years, a mere eyeblink in Earth's...
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FILE - This Friday, June 16, 2017, file photo shows the Google logo at a gadgets show in Paris. Google said it has achieved a breakthrough in quantum computing research, saying its quantum processor has completed a calculation in just a few minutes that would take a traditional supercomputer thousands of years to finish. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
October 23, 2019 - 10:51 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google said it has achieved a breakthrough in quantum computing research, saying an experimental quantum processor has completed a calculation in just a few minutes that would take a traditional supercomputer thousands of years. The findings, published Wednesday in the...
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This undated photo provided by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History in August 2019 shows a facial reconstruction model by John Gurche made from a fossilized cranium of Australopithecus anamensis. The species is considered to be an ancestor of A. afarensis, represented by “Lucy” found in 1974. From 3.8 million years ago, the ancestral species is the oldest known member of Australopithecus, the grouping of creatures that preceded our own branch of the family tree, called Homo. (Matt Crow/Cleveland Museum of Natural History via AP)
August 28, 2019 - 12:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A fossil from Ethiopia is showing scientists a face from millions of years back in our evolutionary history. The discovery, some 3.8 million years old, is from a species that is considered an ancestor of "Lucy," the famous Ethiopian partial skeleton. This ancestral species is a...
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This image provided by the University of Tuebingen in Germany shows the Apidima 1 partial cranium fossil, right, with a piece of rock still attached, and its digital reconstruction from a posterior view, middle, and a side view, left. The rounded shape of the Apidima 1 cranium is a unique feature of modern humans and contrasts sharply with Neanderthals and their ancestors. (Katerina Harvati/University of Tuebingen via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 12:12 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've identified the earliest sign of our species outside Africa, a chunk of skull recovered from a cave in southern Greece. Its estimated age is at least 210,000 years old, making it 16,000 or more years older than an upper jaw bone from Israel that was reported...
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FILE - This May 20, 2019 file photo shows marijuana plants in a grow room using green lights during their night cycle in Gardena, Calif. According to research released on Wednesday, June 12, 2019, archaeologists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of people smoking marijuana from a 2,500-year-old graveyard in western China. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
June 12, 2019 - 1:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Archaeologists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of people smoking marijuana from a 2,500-year-old graveyard in western China. The evidence comes from 10 wooden bowls found in a complex of lofty tombs situated among the Pamir Mountains. Using new techniques for chemical...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, an embryo receives a small dose of Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA in a microscope in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province, during work by scientist He Jiankui's team. A report released on Monday, June 3, 2019, shows that people with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection have heightened overall death rate, warning that genetic tinkering can produce risks. Rasmus Nielsen of the University of California, Berkeley, senior author of the paper, acknowledged that his result cannot be applied directly to the two girls in China. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
June 03, 2019 - 10:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — People with a DNA mutation that reduces their chance of HIV infection may die sooner, according to a study that suggests tinkering with a gene to try to fix one problem may cause others. The study authors cited the case of the Chinese researcher who tried to produce this mutation in...
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This combination of images provided by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig shows two views of a virtual reconstruction of the Xiahe mandible. At right, the simulated parts are in gray. According to a report released on Wednesday, May 1, 2019, the bone is at least 160,000 years old, and recovered proteins led scientists to conclude the jaw came from a Denisovan, a relative of Neanderthals. (Jean-Jacques Hublin, MPI-EVA, Leipzig)
May 01, 2019 - 3:33 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly 40 years after it was found by a monk in a Chinese cave, a fossilized chunk of jawbone has been revealed as coming from a mysterious relative of the Neanderthals. Until now, the only known remains of these Denisovans were a few scraps of bone and teeth recovered in a Siberian...
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This combination of images provided by the Yale School of Medicine in April 2019 shows stained microscope photos of neurons, green; astrocytes, red, and cell nuclei, blue, from a pig brain left untreated for 10 hours after death, left, and another with a specially designed blood substitute pumped through it. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. (Stefano G. Daniele, Zvonimir Vrselja/Sestan Laboratory/Yale School of Medicine)
April 17, 2019 - 12:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards "this is...
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