Seals

FILE - This May 24, 2006, file photo shows the village of Newtok, Alaska, where the eroding bank along the Ninglick River has long been a problem for the village, 480 miles west of Anchorage. Northern Alaska coastal communities and climate scientists say sea ice disappeared far earlier than normal this spring and it's affecting wildlife. The Anchorage Daily News reported in June 2019 that ice melted because of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
June 30, 2019 - 7:50 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Sea ice along northern Alaska disappeared far earlier than normal this spring, alarming coastal residents who rely on wildlife and fish. Ice melted as a result of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures, the Anchorage Daily News reported . The early melting has been "crazy,"...
Read More
In this Friday, May 10, 2019, photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a spotted seal sits in a cage before being released by officials into the sea near Dalian in northeastern China's Liaoning province. Animal groups cheered the release of 37 spotted seal pups rescued from traffickers into the wild in northern China. (Pan Yulong/Xinhua via AP)
May 11, 2019 - 2:08 am
BEIJING (AP) — Animal rights groups on Saturday cheered the release of 37 spotted seal pups rescued from traffickers into the wild in northern China in a small victory for efforts to save the country's endangered species. Humane Society International said the pups were discovered three months ago...
Read More
FILE - In this March 30, 2008 file photo, a harp seal pauses after being released in Maine following treatment after being found stranded earlier in the year. Experts are trying to pinpoint the cause of a sharp increase in harp seal strandings in 2019. About 70 of the marine mammals were found stranded in Maine since Jan. 1, 2019 compared to less than a dozen the previous year. (AP Photo/Joel Page, File)
February 26, 2019 - 1:59 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Experts are trying to pinpoint the cause of a sharp increase in harp seal strandings along the East Coast. The Portland Press Herald reports about 70 of the marine mammals were found stranded in Maine since Jan. 1, compared to about nine the previous year. Biologists have not...
Read More
Elephant seals and their pups occupy Drakes Beach, Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, in Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. Tourists unable to visit a popular beach in Northern California that was taken over by a colony of nursing elephant seals during the government shutdown will be able to get an up-close view of the creatures, officials said Friday. Rangers and volunteer docents will lead small groups of visitors starting Saturday to the edge of a parking lot so they can safely see the elephant seals and their newborn pups, said park spokesman John Dell'Osso. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
February 01, 2019 - 7:19 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — National park visitors cut new trails in sensitive soil. They pried open gates while no one was watching. They found bathrooms locked, so they went outside. One off-roader even mowed down an iconic twisted-limbed Joshua tree in California. During the 35-day government shutdown...
Read More
In this photo taken Monday, Jan. 28, 2019, without tourists and park rangers to discourage them during the government shutdown, elephant seals have expanded their pupping grounds in Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. About 60 adult seals have birthed 35 pups took over a beach knocking down a fence and moving into the parking lot. (John Burgess/The Press Democrat via AP)
January 30, 2019 - 6:34 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A colony of elephant seals took over a beach in Northern California during the government shutdown when there was no staff to discourage the animals from congregating in the popular tourist area, an official said. Now they're not going anywhere. About 60 adult seals that gave...
Read More
In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 6:42 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
Read More