Seniors

In this March 8, 2019 file photo, President Donald Trump talks with reporters outside the White House in Washington. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump promised not to cut Social Security, Medicare, or Medicaid. In the White House, Trump went back on his promise not to cut Medicaid. Now he’s being criticized for steep Medicare payment cuts to hospitals in his new budget. The head of a major hospital association says in a blog that the impact on care for seniors would be “devastating.” The White House says it’s not cutting Medicare but making better use of taxpayers’ dollars. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
March 12, 2019 - 3:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are accusing President Donald Trump of going back on his campaign promise to protect Medicare after he introduced a 2020 budget that calls for steep cuts in Medicare payments to hospitals. The budget embodies long-standing Republican ambitions "to make Medicare wither on...
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Acting OMB Director Russ Vought speaks during a press briefing at the White House, Monday, March 11, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
March 11, 2019 - 8:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's proposed 2020 budget (all times local): 9:35 p.m. Hospital groups are objecting strongly to hundreds of billions of dollars in proposed Medicare and Medicaid payment cuts in President Donald Trump's budget. Two major hospital trade groups did...
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FILE - In a May 19, 2015 file photo, R. Scott Turner, Professor of Neurology and Director of the Memory Disorder Center at Georgetown University Hospital, points to PET scan results that are part of a study on Allheimer's disease at Georgetown University Hospital, in Washington. An Alzheimer’s Association survey being released Tuesday, March 5, 2019 found about half of seniors say they’ve ever discussed thinking or memory with a health provider, and less than a third report ever getting formally assessed for cognitive problems. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
March 04, 2019 - 11:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Few seniors get their thinking and memory abilities regularly tested during check-ups, according to a new report from the Alzheimer's Association that raises questions about how best to find out if a problem is brewing. Medicare pays for an annual "wellness visit" that is supposed...
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Alex Vanegas, center, who had been imprisoned by the government of President Daniel Ortega for protesting against the regime, is released by prison authorities, in Managua, Nicaragua, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019. Ortega's government has released dozens of people arrested in a last year's crackdown on street protests, just hours before talks between the government and opponents are scheduled to begin. (AP Photo/Alfredo Zuniga)
February 27, 2019 - 7:42 pm
MANAGUA, Nicaragua (AP) — Representatives of President Daniel Ortega and the opposition sat down face-to-face in a restart of long-stalled talks on resolving Nicaragua's political crisis Wednesday, shortly after authorities released dozens of people arrested in last year's crackdown on anti-...
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FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 12, 2018 file photo, Britain's Prince Philip waits for the bridal procession following the wedding of Princess Eugenie of York and Jack Brooksbank in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, near London, England. Buckingham Palace said Saturday Feb. 9, 2019, that 97-year-old Prince Philip has decided to stop driving, less than a month after he was involved in a collision that left two women injured. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, Pool, File)
February 09, 2019 - 2:10 pm
LONDON (AP) — Prince Philip has decided to stop driving at the age of 97, less than a month after he was involved in a collision that left two women injured, Buckingham Palace said Saturday. Prosecutors said they would consider the decision as they decide whether to charge the husband of Queen...
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Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso speaks during a budget committee meeting at the lower house of the parliament in Tokyo Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. Aso reluctantly apologized for saying childless people are to blame for the country's rising social security costs and its aging and declining population. Aso said Tuesday that he apologized if some people found his remarks "unpleasant." (Yohei Kanasashi/Kyodo News via AP)
February 05, 2019 - 2:38 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's Finance Minister Taro Aso has reluctantly apologized for saying childless people are to blame for the country's rising social security costs and its aging and declining population. "If it made some people feel uncomfortable, I apologize," Aso said Tuesday after drawing...
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James Jackson, right, confers with his lawyer during a hearing in criminal court, Wednesday Jan. 23, 2019 in New York. Jackson, a white supremacist, pled guilty Wednesday, to killing a black man with a sword as part of a racist plot that prosecutors described as a hate crime.  He faces life in prison when he is sentenced on Feb. 13. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
January 23, 2019 - 12:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A white supremacist pleaded guilty Wednesday to killing a black man with a sword as part of an attack that authorities said was intended to incite a race war in the United States. James Jackson admitted to fatally stabbing 66-year-old Timothy Caughman in March 2017 after stalking a...
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Doris Cochran poses for a portrait in her apartment in Arlington, Va., on Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
January 21, 2019 - 3:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Doris Cochran, a disabled mother of two young boys, is stockpiling canned foods these days, filling her shelves with noodle soup, green beans, peaches and pears — anything that can last for months or even years. Her pantry looks as though she's preparing for a winter storm. But...
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FILE - This Nov. 1, 2017 file photo shows prints of some of the Facebook ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, in Washington. According to a study published Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 in Science Advances, people over 65 and conservatives shared far more false information in 2016 on Facebook than others. Researchers say that for every piece of “fake news” shared by young adults or moderates or super liberals, senior citizens and very conservatives shared about 7 false items. Experts say seniors might not discern truth from fiction on social media as easily. They say sheer volume of pro-Trump false info may have skewed the sharing numbers to the right. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)
January 09, 2019 - 1:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sharing false information on Facebook is old. People over 65 and ultra conservatives shared about seven times more fake information masquerading as news on the social media site than younger adults, moderates and super liberals during the 2016 election season, a new study finds...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, nominated by President Bill Clinton, sits with fellow Supreme Court justices for a group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington, Friday. The Supreme Court says Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has undergone surgery to remove two malignant growths from her left lung. It is Ginsburg’s third bout with cancer since joining the court in 1993. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 22, 2018 - 8:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is resting in a New York hospital following surgery to remove two malignant growths in her left lung, the third time the Supreme Court's oldest justice has been treated for cancer and her second stay in a hospital in two months. Worries over Ginsburg's...
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